This feature is another game changer.  When you start building up several files in your Silhouette library, sometimes you want to get a glimpse of a file or recall who the original designer was.  You can now double click on the small thumbnail and it expands to a pop out screen with all the pertinent info and details.  What a timesaver.  With a slider button, you can expand or decrease the thumbnails in this preview panel.  Enhancing visibility when you have multiple files to look through is another huge enhancement.  This feature gets a 5 star rating.
In the 30 Rock episode "Goodbye, My Friend", TGS cast members begin to sing the song following an announcement about the royalty fee for singing "Happy Birthday to You" on a television show. The cast is interrupted after the first line by a character entering the scene.[citation needed] In the Community episode "Mixology Certification", a scene starts with the last two words of the song ("... to you"), implying it had been sung in its entirety, before Pierce confusedly asks, "How come we only sang the last two words?"[citation needed]
Artist Notes: Send funny Happy 32nd Birthday greetings with this design that features an overall wood effect with a humorous sentiment based on trees and wood. Front sentiment is "You look so awesome! No one "Wood" believe you're 32" Inside sentiment is "Just don't let them count your rings. Have a tree-mendous birthday!" All wood effects are digitally created.
I don't know if it's just the Avery software of what but these do not print the way that you see them on screen. It's incredibly frustrating when something is centered and there should be no problem with it printing centered on both the front and back but the cards end up overlapping and you can't print doubled sided because they just don't print right. I never have this type of problem when I print regular index cards or word/pdf documents so I'm going with its an Avery software glitch but as long as you print one-sided they're OK.

None of the early appearances of the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics included credits or copyright notices. The Summy Company registered a copyright in 1935, crediting authors Preston Ware Orem and Mrs. R. R. Forman. In 1988, Warner/Chappell Music purchased the company owning the copyright for US$25 million, with the value of "Happy Birthday" estimated at US$5 million.[10][11] Based on the 1935 copyright registration, Warner claimed that the United States copyright will not expire until 2030, and that unauthorized public performances of the song are illegal unless royalties are paid to Warner. In one specific instance in February 2010, the royalty for a single use was said to be US$700.[12] By one estimate, the song is the highest-earning single song in history.[13] In the European Union, the copyright for the song expired on January 1, 2017.[14]
When someone near and dear to your heart turns another year older, you’ll want to do everything you can to make their day extra memorable. Whether you’re throwing a birthday party, a cocktail party or planning a dinner at the honoree’s favorite restaurant, it’s tradition to give the guest of honor a Happy Birthday card. As if picking out a card wasn’t tough enough, on top of that you’ll need to craft a happy birthday message too.

DLTK's Standard Printable Greeting Cards - these are the cards we've always had on the site.  They include birthday cards, thank-you cards, birthday invitations and a wide variety of other types of cards you can print in either color or B&W.  Over 1000 cards in over 100 different themes are available.  You cannot type your own messages on-line on these ones.
One more of my vintage illustrations: this time shabby-looking old fashioned retro photo camera. Illustration is based on my father's old Fujifilm finepix x100 camera. I had never used  this camera, I prefer instant digital photos. I can't imaging paying on each and every photo, just to see it. But I like vintage things and vintage clip art and I enjoy to share my finds. 
You can use your regular weight printer paper! Really! The idea of a printable is that it’s artwork that might be temporary or easy to switch out for something new. However, if you’ve fallen in love with one of my printables (aw, shucks!) and would like a more permanent piece of art, I recommend photo paper (matte), cardstock, premium (heavyweight) paper or archival paper. Make sure to check your printer settings and adjust the paper accordingly so it will not get stuck inside your printer. This is especially true for thicker paper.
On September 22, 2015, federal judge George H. King ruled[40] that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim over the lyrics was invalid.[41][42] The 1935 copyright held by Warner/Chappell applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, not the lyrics or melody.[43] The court held that the question of whether the 1922 and 1927 publications were authorized, thus placing the song in the public domain, presented questions of fact that would need to be resolved at trial.[40] However, Warner/Chappell had failed to prove that it actually had ever held a copyright to the lyrics, so the court was able to grant summary judgment to the plaintiffs, thus resolving the case.[40]

This versatile pack of 150 printable cards is wonderful for designing and printing your own sales & marketing collateral, flash cards, recipes, coupons, RSVP cards, decorative post cards and more. These blank index cards are unlined, ready for whatever destiny you have planned for them. They are ideal for the classroom, homework, studying, filing and contact information cards. A micro-perforated design makes them quick and easy to separate, so you can maximize your productivity at your workplace, classroom or home. Choose from the thousands of free templates and designs at avery.com/templates to add attention-grabbing text and graphics to both sides of your blank index card, and then print them out on your laser or inkjet printer for exceptional smudge and jam-free results. Convenient, easy-to-use and endlessly customizable, these unruled index cards are an unbeatable choice for an all-purpose printable card.
About NotedTravelers:  A few years ago, while obsessively researching packing lists for trips to Ireland, I heard about Traveler’s Notebooks. There were pictures of lovely watercolor paintings and descriptions of overseas adventures. Well, I thought, I’ll be traveling soon and I occasionally write notes. This must be the perfect thing for me, nevermind that all of my previous attempts at journaling had been non-starters.
Well it is also cost effective. A lot less expensive to purchase a download and then print it yourself on your home printer, at your local printshop, or online through a website. I don't know if it's more of an impulse purchase. I think it is attractive to people that like DIY projects. By using a downloadable file you have a lot of options for printing as opposed to only have it printed in one way.
While perusing another decor blog I came across a great site for inexpensive art.  It is called Vintage Printables and is full of options for your walls.  All you have to do is look through the art, find the perfect print and take it to Kinkos to have it blown up.  All in all it should cost you a few bucks, minus the frame which I suggest HomeGoods for those.  Or even Goodwill…you can always find a used frame there and spruce it up with some spray paint!  
If your customer would be benefitted by having the high-res or high color print professionally printed, suggest it. Even if it’s at your local Staples® make the suggestion to save them time and aggravation. If your products are business forms, to-do lists, etc., a home printer will do, so let them know. Have your cover sheet also include any specific instructions about your product, and a thank you.
These pretty printables are fabulous and free…you can’t go wrong with that! Decorate your home with quotes and flowers, throw a party that looks like a million bucks or wrap a gift with the perfect tag.  Oh my gosh…you are going to love these!!!  There’s a little something for everyone.  I wish I could share a photo of each one, but my blog would most likely blow up…ha!

1) The easiest way to use this printout  is to print it out on a full sheet of white sticker paper and if you own a Silhouette Cameo or Silhouette Portrait or other digital cutter you can cut out the to-do lists or planner stickers using their designer software. ( **Please note:  You must have the Silhouette Designer Edition software upgrade to open pdfs in your Silhouette. I also have redesigned the template so that the margins are within the “registration” area of your silhouette.   You will have to spend some time creating the cutlines for the silhouette  but this should make creating the cutfile a lot easier.)
Have I made my point yet?  They are not kidding when they say bioDIVERSITY.  There is literally every form of living thing available to choose from.  Butterflies and water fowl, more frogs, turtles and lizards than I ever knew existed.  Weird fancy pigeons, big and small game animals…it just goes on and on and on.  The only bad part is you can’t search for specific images but hey, it’s free!
I'm about to start a Etsy store. I'll be selling art prints. I can't decide whether to sell downloads or physical prints. If I do physical prints I'll be using the Printful integration. I've done some research on Etsy and I see others selling downloads and from the looks of it they are making a killing. 80k in sales of 6 dollar downloads over just a few years. So there is definitely a market for it. I realize however some people might not want the hassle of printing themselves. Which is why I am questioning the digital download idea. However, as I said the digital download shops seem to be doing really well. More then just a few I've found are doing well. I realize that there is always the possibility of someone stealing my work after downloading. I'm fine that since really if someone buys a physical print they could technically make a high quality scan of it and then do the same as they might with a download. For those that offer downloads what is your experience?
Still, if you prefer to use your own photos and images and want to create quarter- or half-fold cards, Greeting Box may be a good fit. Since Greeting Box doesn’t have photo editing tools, you need to use another application, such as Apple’s Photos, to correct red-eye and crop images before you upload them. Once the images are in the software, you can only drag, layer, rotate and reverse them. There’s also a transparency option, but compared to Hallmark Card Studio’s design suite, which includes more effects and filters, Greeting Box’s tools are very basic. This program’s biggest benefit is its price – it only costs $9.99. Other greeting cards programs cost between $40.00 and $50.00. Our best pick, Canva, is a subscription service with a fee that, over time, can make it cost even more. While Canva has a limited free version, it can be frustrating to only have access to some of the features and graphics, and Greeting Box gives you full access with your initial download. Also, you can order more clip art directly from Greeting Box for a few extra dollars.
I'm about to start a Etsy store. I'll be selling art prints. I can't decide whether to sell downloads or physical prints. If I do physical prints I'll be using the Printful integration. I've done some research on Etsy and I see others selling downloads and from the looks of it they are making a killing. 80k in sales of 6 dollar downloads over just a few years. So there is definitely a market for it. I realize however some people might not want the hassle of printing themselves. Which is why I am questioning the digital download idea. However, as I said the digital download shops seem to be doing really well. More then just a few I've found are doing well. I realize that there is always the possibility of someone stealing my work after downloading. I'm fine that since really if someone buys a physical print they could technically make a high quality scan of it and then do the same as they might with a download. For those that offer downloads what is your experience?
Poinsettia is one of the most associated plants with Christmas in North America. It's Christmas history began in Mexico in 16 century. According to the legend, one poor girl had nothing else to bring to a church as a gift to celebrate Jesus birthday, except wild weeds. But miracle happened and crimson flower sprouted from the weeds. In Mexico Poinsettia is called "La Flor de la Nochebuena", which means Flower of the Christmas Eve or Flower of the Holy Night. But common english name "Poinsettia" came from the name of the the first United States Minister to Mexico, Joel Roberts Poinsett. In 1825 he was the first who brought this plant into the United States.

Every once in a while I'd add a new printable to my store - just single page downloads that I actually hobbled together with Picmonkey. Creating printables in Picmonkey was painstakingly slow work since it's really supposed to be used for graphic editing and creation, but at the time, Picmonkey was the only program I knew. *Fun fact, I'm a self-taught graphic designer and all I use is Picmonkey! 
When you sit down with a blank greeting card in front of you, don’t be surprised if you can’t seem to put the pen to paper. Many of us get a case of writers block when we sit down to write a birthday card greeting, especially to the people we love the most. Sure, the birthday honoree knows just how much you love and appreciate him or her but, it doesn’t hurt to remind them on their day.

About PatternsbyGwen:  Hi my name is Gwen. I’m a 27 year old who grew up loving all crafts.  I started doing stained glass at age 24 when I moved to a big city and took an intro to stained glass class at the local art center. I was hooked! I have a number of other hobbies that I mean to tie in with stained glass. It captures my imagination like no other medium!
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I love to cook and decided that I need a recipe card box out of sheer hatred for the add-filled, biographical oubliettes that food websites have become. I'm not using microsoft word, so i didnt even bother trying to download the templates, but I just set the page format to center on the measurements of the cards and everything printed predictably. My printer had no trouble with the card stock and I didn't even have to change the settings, which is great because I totally forgot to check that.

The three central schedules in most across the board utilise today are the Gregorian, Jewish, and Islamic calendars. The term date-book itself is taken from calendae, the term for the primary day of the month in the Roman timetable, identified with the verb calare "to get out", alluding to the "calling" of the new moon when it was first seen. Latin calendarium signified "account book, enroll" (as records were settled and obligations were gathered on the calends of every month). The Latin expression was embraced in Old French as calendier and from that point in Middle English as calendar by the thirteenth century (the spelling schedule is early current).

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