It is traditional, among English-speakers, that at a birthday party, the song "Happy Birthday to You" be sung to the birthday person by the other guests celebrating the birthday. More specifically, the birthday person is traditionally presented with a birthday cake with lit candles, with the number of candles sometimes corresponding to the age of the person. After the song is sung (usually just once), party guests sometimes add wishes like "and many more!" expressing the hope that the birthday person will enjoy a long life. The birthday person may be asked to make a wish ("Make a wish!")—which he or she does silently—and then is supposed to blow out the candles. Traditionally, blowing out the candles is believed (or is considered a lighthearted superstition) to ensure that the wish will come true.[20] Once the candles have been blown out, people may applaud, after which the cake may be served, often with the first piece being served to the person whose birthday it is.
I'm about to start a Etsy store. I'll be selling art prints. I can't decide whether to sell downloads or physical prints. If I do physical prints I'll be using the Printful integration. I've done some research on Etsy and I see others selling downloads and from the looks of it they are making a killing. 80k in sales of 6 dollar downloads over just a few years. So there is definitely a market for it. I realize however some people might not want the hassle of printing themselves. Which is why I am questioning the digital download idea. However, as I said the digital download shops seem to be doing really well. More then just a few I've found are doing well. I realize that there is always the possibility of someone stealing my work after downloading. I'm fine that since really if someone buys a physical print they could technically make a high quality scan of it and then do the same as they might with a download. For those that offer downloads what is your experience?
Still, if you prefer to use your own photos and images and want to create quarter- or half-fold cards, Greeting Box may be a good fit. Since Greeting Box doesn’t have photo editing tools, you need to use another application, such as Apple’s Photos, to correct red-eye and crop images before you upload them. Once the images are in the software, you can only drag, layer, rotate and reverse them. There’s also a transparency option, but compared to Hallmark Card Studio’s design suite, which includes more effects and filters, Greeting Box’s tools are very basic. This program’s biggest benefit is its price – it only costs $9.99. Other greeting cards programs cost between $40.00 and $50.00. Our best pick, Canva, is a subscription service with a fee that, over time, can make it cost even more. While Canva has a limited free version, it can be frustrating to only have access to some of the features and graphics, and Greeting Box gives you full access with your initial download. Also, you can order more clip art directly from Greeting Box for a few extra dollars.
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