At the end of that month, I was at a turning point again. I had made $1000 in passive income, yes, but I knew it was mostly due to marketing to my list. How was I going to continue to make that amount in sales? I knew I couldn't keep marketing the same product to my same list month after month. At that moment, I was at a fork in the road where I almost went down the path of "Oh, maybe I'll create something new and sell that next." Luckily, I remembered a piece of advice that prevented me from doing that. I remembered Denise Duffield-Thomas (the Get Rich Lucky Bit#h lady) talking about how women have a tendency to keep creating something new over and over instead of sticking to one core, amazing product and finding endless ways of selling the SAME thing.
In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."
A great tip Sarah shared was to encourage independence in smaller children so they can be playing alone and entertained at least for a short time while you do some work. Sarah has been able to achieve her goal of making a part-time income on her own terms with lots of flexibility. Although she tries to continually create new products, she knows that her business was built to allow for flexibility and put her family first.  So Sarah doesn't stress if she can't add new products for a while.  Her business works for her – not the other way around!
As with editing tools, Macs have built-in sharing features you can access through your Apple account. When you save a file to your computer, you can use Finder to connect to social media or iCloud and share your projects from there. Because of this, most Mac greeting card applications don’t include features that let you share your finished cards to social media directly from the software.
About PatternsbyGwen:  Hi my name is Gwen. I’m a 27 year old who grew up loving all crafts.  I started doing stained glass at age 24 when I moved to a big city and took an intro to stained glass class at the local art center. I was hooked! I have a number of other hobbies that I mean to tie in with stained glass. It captures my imagination like no other medium!

First, you will need to do at least a Google search, words and/or image, to be sure you won’t run into any copyright or trademark issues. You can also search records at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office online and the Copyright Office online. It may sound silly, but it could end up costing you a lot of time or money if your idea is infringing on someone else’s work.
Because Apple includes applications for photo editing and creative projects in its macOS, we found most of the Mac greeting card design programs we tested have fewer editing tools than their PC-compatible counterparts. This means you may need to edit photos in another application before you upload them to your greeting card software. A few of the programs we tested have some basic editing tools, such as those for cropping and fixing red-eye, but those same programs have lower quality graphics.
I priced the Plan, Do, Review kit at $10 - much more than any printable price I had listed before. This was a significant baby step because I was learning that a comprehensive collection of printables was something that I could not only charge MORE for, but it was also something that would SELL BETTER. As that kit started to sell more than any of my other "cheap" printables, I realized that people were a lot more excited to buy my $10 product than they were to buy my $2 or $3 products. Somehow I thought that my cheaper stuff would sell faster. I was wrong and in December 2014, because of that $10 kit, I made $254.50 in sales in that one month, which was so exciting for me since I had only made $186.00 the previous 12 months combined!

Prior to the lawsuit, Warner/Chappell had been earning $2 million a year licensing the song for commercial use,[44] with a notable example the $5,000 paid by the filmmakers of the 1994 documentary, Hoop Dreams,[47] in order to safely distribute the film.[48] On February 8, 2016, Warner/Chappell agreed to pay a settlement of $14 million to those who had licensed the song, and would allow a final judgment declaring the song to be in the public domain, with a final hearing scheduled in March 2016.[49][50] On June 28, 2016, the final settlement was officially granted and the court declared that the song was in the public domain.[18] The following week, Nelson's short-form documentary, Happy Birthday: my campaign to liberate the people's song, was published online by The Guardian.[51]
Thank you so much for this resource! I used it to download a bunch of great images that we have put on custom olive oil labels and big canvas shopping bags that have ironed on images. Each person/family will get a bottle and bag that coordinate, but no two are alike. We did the olive oil through The Olive Oil Source. This is what we are giving this year as our homemade gift! (We will add some spiced nuts too because our family would kill us if we skipped them.) I just cannot get over how awesome the feed is, but I do have one piece of advice (learned the hard way): Leave it open in a tab as you go through and download, so that you can pick up where you left off. I stopped after about 75 pages, but when I wanted to venture back I had to leap frog about 8 pages at a time.
Make sure you save your Word, jpg or Excel files as a pdf. Pdf’s are generally easier to print. They can also be secured so that no one can download and change your product. Most programs give you the ability to “save as” to a pdf. If you use an Adobe product like Illustrator, it’s part of the program. If you use other art/graphic sites like Canva, Picmonkey you can always convert or print the jpgs to a pdf.
Well it is also cost effective. A lot less expensive to purchase a download and then print it yourself on your home printer, at your local printshop, or online through a website. I don't know if it's more of an impulse purchase. I think it is attractive to people that like DIY projects. By using a downloadable file you have a lot of options for printing as opposed to only have it printed in one way.
A great tip Sarah shared was to encourage independence in smaller children so they can be playing alone and entertained at least for a short time while you do some work. Sarah has been able to achieve her goal of making a part-time income on her own terms with lots of flexibility. Although she tries to continually create new products, she knows that her business was built to allow for flexibility and put her family first.  So Sarah doesn't stress if she can't add new products for a while.  Her business works for her - not the other way around!
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