Do you have a blog? or have you thought of finding blogs in your niche to offer free printables to/ credit to your shop for review on their blog? possibly offer to do some work for a few blogs (a few freebies) in exchange put at bottom of printable (designed by GrinandPrint for Barefoot Budgeting) with your link in print? Also, twitter!! Instagram is really your best form of media for printables in my opinion but touching on them all and don’t give up. I’ve heard that the more you have in your shop and great key words (check your competition) are also great ways to increase views 🙂 Keep in touch if you think I can be of any assistance with any of these.
This is where Pinterest came in. I decided that I was going to use Pinterest as my marketing platform. I wasn't going to spread myself thin across multiple social media arenas. I was going to focus on one, and I knew that Pinterest was the right one for me because it was where I went when I was hungry for printables, so I was familiar with how I could leverage it for my own. Also, Pinterest has this magic fairy dust that is great for businesses - it puts its users in a take-action/shopping frame of mind. When people are on Pinterest, they are typically there because they want to improve some aspect of their life. They are looking for solutions, which often results in a purchase. 
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
The documentary film The Corporation states that Warner/Chappell charged up to US$10,000 for the song to appear in a film. Because of the copyright issue, filmmakers rarely showed complete singalongs of "Happy Birthday" in films, either substituting the public-domain "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" or avoiding using a song entirely. Before the song was copyrighted it was used freely, as in Bosko's Party, a Warner Bros. cartoon of 1932, where a chorus of animals sings it twice through. The copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" is directly referenced in a 2009 episode of the TV series iCarly, "iMake Sam Girlier", in which the main character as well as others begin to sing the song to Sam but are prevented from doing so by Freddie, who says the song isn't public domain; "For She's a Jolly Good Fellow" is then sung instead.
Warner/Chappell Music acquired Birch Tree Group Limited in 1988 for US$25 million.[10][11] The company continued to insist that one cannot sing the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics for profit without paying royalties: in 2008, Warner collected about US$5,000 per day (US$2 million per year) in royalties for the song.[27] Warner/Chappell claimed copyright for every use in film, television, radio, anywhere open to the public, and for any group where a substantial number of those in attendance are not family or friends of whoever is performing the song. Brauneis cited problems with the song's authorship and the notice and renewal of the copyright, and concluded: "It is almost certainly no longer under copyright."[3][16]

Features Clean Edge technology provides smooth, non-perforated edges. Ultra-fine perforations separate cards cleanly and easily. Heavyweight cardstock features ultra-fine perforations so cards separate cleanly and easily. Folds and sits atop any flat surface. High quality, heavyweight cardstock. Heavyweight cardstock feeds directly from printer tray.
And so, in June 2015, I released my Life Binder product to the world - meaning I listed it on Etsy and told my email list about it. Then...my phone started "cha-chinging" more than it ever had before! By the end of the month, I had reached $1000 in sales! That blew my mind. I had made more in one month with one product than I had in the last 18 months! 
Totally understand. Currently I am selling digital abstract designs so not photography. So while colors are still important it’s a bit different then photographs. Obviously part of the photography process is retouching in Photoshop and all your hard work can go down the drain if someone went and printed your work incorrectly. So printing yourself is obviously the way to go for photography.
Still, if you prefer to use your own photos and images and want to create quarter- or half-fold cards, Greeting Box may be a good fit. Since Greeting Box doesn’t have photo editing tools, you need to use another application, such as Apple’s Photos, to correct red-eye and crop images before you upload them. Once the images are in the software, you can only drag, layer, rotate and reverse them. There’s also a transparency option, but compared to Hallmark Card Studio’s design suite, which includes more effects and filters, Greeting Box’s tools are very basic. This program’s biggest benefit is its price – it only costs $9.99. Other greeting cards programs cost between $40.00 and $50.00. Our best pick, Canva, is a subscription service with a fee that, over time, can make it cost even more. While Canva has a limited free version, it can be frustrating to only have access to some of the features and graphics, and Greeting Box gives you full access with your initial download. Also, you can order more clip art directly from Greeting Box for a few extra dollars.
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