Hi, I love looking at all of your post and have printed and used some of them, they are just wonderful and I love looking at all the pictures. I am subscribed to your site but do not get your post in my email anymore. I did get them and then a few months back they stopped coming. I have a yahoo email do you think that has anything to do with it? Is there another way I can get them sent right to me instead of finding them on other sites?
Note to my readers:  I recently changed over to a new ad network and have worked to make sure that the ads displayed on this site are G rated  and family friendly.  However,  from time to time you might see an ad that you find offensive.  Don’t hesitate to report the ad by clicking on the lower right hand corner of the ad.  I want my readers to be happy and satisfied with the content provided on this site.  

Do you have a blog? or have you thought of finding blogs in your niche to offer free printables to/ credit to your shop for review on their blog? possibly offer to do some work for a few blogs (a few freebies) in exchange put at bottom of printable (designed by GrinandPrint for Barefoot Budgeting) with your link in print? Also, twitter!! Instagram is really your best form of media for printables in my opinion but touching on them all and don’t give up. I’ve heard that the more you have in your shop and great key words (check your competition) are also great ways to increase views 🙂 Keep in touch if you think I can be of any assistance with any of these.
In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."

A great tip Sarah shared was to encourage independence in smaller children so they can be playing alone and entertained at least for a short time while you do some work. Sarah has been able to achieve her goal of making a part-time income on her own terms with lots of flexibility. Although she tries to continually create new products, she knows that her business was built to allow for flexibility and put her family first.  So Sarah doesn't stress if she can't add new products for a while.  Her business works for her – not the other way around!
Cover Verse: Happy Birthday, Daughter If you can laugh often, love deeply, and let the dreams of your heart create your tomorrow... Inside Verse: If, no matter how busy life gets, you can find joy and wonder in the little things and a few quiet moments for yourself... If every day you feel as loved, as beautiful, as celebrated as you do today... Then you'll always know the kind of happiness a daughter like you deserves.

I don't know if it's just the Avery software of what but these do not print the way that you see them on screen. It's incredibly frustrating when something is centered and there should be no problem with it printing centered on both the front and back but the cards end up overlapping and you can't print doubled sided because they just don't print right. I never have this type of problem when I print regular index cards or word/pdf documents so I'm going with its an Avery software glitch but as long as you print one-sided they're OK.
I don't know if it's just the Avery software of what but these do not print the way that you see them on screen. It's incredibly frustrating when something is centered and there should be no problem with it printing centered on both the front and back but the cards end up overlapping and you can't print doubled sided because they just don't print right. I never have this type of problem when I print regular index cards or word/pdf documents so I'm going with its an Avery software glitch but as long as you print one-sided they're OK.
Numbers nerd. Guilty. I have always completely geeked out when working in Excel and creating spreadsheets that provide the information I need quickly and easily. I hate wasting my time in activities that do not add value and focus my efforts on being efficient as possible. My desire is to help others do the same! The files I create are tailored to the spreadsheet novice and do all the calculating for you. They are also always formatting to print out just right in case you need a hard copy.
The documentary film The Corporation states that Warner/Chappell charged up to US$10,000 for the song to appear in a film. Because of the copyright issue, filmmakers rarely showed complete singalongs of "Happy Birthday" in films, either substituting the public-domain "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" or avoiding using a song entirely. Before the song was copyrighted it was used freely, as in Bosko's Party, a Warner Bros. cartoon of 1932, where a chorus of animals sings it twice through. The copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" is directly referenced in a 2009 episode of the TV series iCarly, "iMake Sam Girlier", in which the main character as well as others begin to sing the song to Sam but are prevented from doing so by Freddie, who says the song isn't public domain; "For She's a Jolly Good Fellow" is then sung instead.
"Happy Birthday to You", also known as "Happy Birthday", is a song traditionally sung to celebrate the anniversary of a person's birth. According to the 1998 Guinness World Records, it is the most recognized song in the English language, followed by "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow". The song's base lyrics have been translated into at least 18 languages.[1] The melody of "Happy Birthday to You" comes from the song "Good Morning to All",[2] which has traditionally been attributed to American sisters Patty and Mildred J. Hill in 1893,[3][4] although the claim that the sisters composed the tune is disputed.[5]
Also, if you are new to this site, I wanted to let you know  that I have a board on Pinterest  that  you might want to follow that has several pins (ideas) by other planner designers, stationery, home office decor,  office supplies and planner freebies that are mostly planner related, you can view that and/or follow here,  Home Office | Planners & Stationery Favs.
On July 28, 2015, one day prior to a scheduled ruling, Nelson's attorneys Betsy Manifold and Mark Rifkin presented new evidence that they argued was conclusive proof that the song was in the public domain, "thus making it unnecessary for the Court to decide the scope or validity of the disputed copyrights, much less whether Patty Hill abandoned any copyright she may have had to the lyrics". Several weeks prior, they had been given access to documents held back from them by Warner/Chappell, which included a copy of the 15th edition of The Everyday Song Book, published in 1927. The book contained "Good Morning and Happy Birthday", but the copy was blurry, obscuring a line of text below the title. Manifold and Rifkin located a clearer copy of an older edition, published in 1922, that also contained the "Happy Birthday" lyrics. The previously obscured line was revealed to be the credit "Special permission through courtesy of The Clayton F Summy Co.". Manifold and Rifkin argued that because the music and lyrics were published without a valid copyright notice as was required at the time, "Happy Birthday" was in the public domain.[38]
“Thank you for your purchase! I hope it gives you everything you wanted. While all digital sales are final, and returns or refunds are not allowed after purchase, I am ALWAYS available should you have any questions or concerns. Please keep in mind that computers and printers may show colors differently and I cannot guaranty color matching. Also keep in mind that this product is for your personal, non-commercial use. You may [if a business/planner form or a product you will allow limited sharing] share this product with _____. All rights to this product remain the property of (name/company name].”
About BossLadyPrintables:  I’ve been a project and program manager for over 10 years now, with a diverse background working in multiple Fortune 500 companies. I became interested in creating career-focused printables after searching Etsy for specific types of files and coming up empty. I was looking for digital downloads that I felt were professional enough for a formal office setting and that I could use confidently, with clean and modern design elements.
I wanted to be that girl. Even though I had achieved my first dream at that point where I was able to make all my money online as a virtual assistant basically, I was still trading hours for dollars. I knew that my finances would take a hit as a result of taking a vacation. I did NOT want to feel like my money was running out while I was traveling. I did NOT want to come home broke.
Everyone gets to have one every year, and it's a day for celebrating. Send your friends and loved ones happy birthday wishes with birthday cards from Hallmark. For more than 100 years, we've been helping people celebrate their day of birth, and a card is a great way to show you card—so much longer-lasting than a social media post. You can choose from thousands of birthday cards to fit any mood or relationship; browse funny birthday cards as well as sweet, uplifting, heartfelt and religious birthday cards. From musical birthday cards to the exquisite hand-crafted detail of Signature cards to cool pop-up cards, you'll find a unique birthday card for any age.
Some initial news sources characterized the decision as ruling that the song was in the public domain,[43][44] but the decision did not go so far, holding only that Warner/Chappell did not prove they owned the copyright.[41] However, because there are no other claimants to the copyright, and the copyright to the melody long ago expired,[45] the plaintiffs suggested that the song was de facto in the public domain.[41] Also, the judge ruled that the song was not copyrighted by Summy Co., who had written in the song book, "Special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F. Summy Co." Since there was no evidence Summy Co. had copyright on the song, the song is still considered to be in the public domain.[46]

This versatile pack of 150 printable cards is wonderful for designing and printing your own sales & marketing collateral, flash cards, recipes, coupons, RSVP cards, decorative post cards and more. These blank index cards are unlined, ready for whatever destiny you have planned for them. They are ideal for the classroom, homework, studying, filing and contact information cards. A micro-perforated design makes them quick and easy to separate, so you can maximize your productivity at your workplace, classroom or home. Choose from the thousands of free templates and designs at avery.com/templates to add attention-grabbing text and graphics to both sides of your blank index card, and then print them out on your laser or inkjet printer for exceptional smudge and jam-free results. Convenient, easy-to-use and endlessly customizable, these unruled index cards are an unbeatable choice for an all-purpose printable card.

First, you will need to do at least a Google search, words and/or image, to be sure you won’t run into any copyright or trademark issues. You can also search records at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office online and the Copyright Office online. It may sound silly, but it could end up costing you a lot of time or money if your idea is infringing on someone else’s work.


Silhouette knocked it out of the park with this sophisticated feature.  This tool  enables you to warp your text in the preselected shapes shown or as the picture shows– it places a grid and small handles on the text.  With the object selected you can basically “warp” or manipulate the text as you wish.  This feature is great for SVG designers.  This feature is standard in the Adobe Software Suite ( Photoshop, Illustrator)  so this feature gets a 5 star rating from me.


Hi Angie! Just wanted to contact you about using a couple of your vintage portraits on our church website. We’re doing a promotion for our church directory, trying to encourage folks to get in and get their photos taken and I wanted to do a slide using the couple that could be a wedding photo and the one of the grandma in the garden. While it’s not exactly a “commercial” use, it’s a little more than a “personal” use so I wanted to be sure and have permission before using them! I’m a big fan of your blog and Facebook page and have gained so much inspiration from you! Thanks so much!
Definitely an idea but less time consuming to do just one or the other. Also I'm thinking of the confusion for the customer. From what I see some digital download shop owners will offer physical prints but they do it as a "blank" store item customers can buy and then reference the image they want printed so I might do that. Do you sell digital downloads or physical prints?
On September 22, 2015, federal judge George H. King ruled[40] that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim over the lyrics was invalid.[41][42] The 1935 copyright held by Warner/Chappell applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, not the lyrics or melody.[43] The court held that the question of whether the 1922 and 1927 publications were authorized, thus placing the song in the public domain, presented questions of fact that would need to be resolved at trial.[40] However, Warner/Chappell had failed to prove that it actually had ever held a copyright to the lyrics, so the court was able to grant summary judgment to the plaintiffs, thus resolving the case.[40]
On June 13, 2013, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Nelson filed a putative class action suit in federal court for the Southern District of New York against Warner/Chappell in the name of her production company, Good Morning to You Productions.[5] As part of a documentary she was making about the song and its history, she had paid US$1,500 to secure the rights. Her complaint relied heavily on Brauneis's research, seeking not only the return of her money but all royalties collected by the company from other filmmakers since 2009.[10][29][30] A week later a similar case was filed in the Central District of California, Rupa Marya v. Warner Chappell Music Inc, Case No. 2:13-cv-04460.[31] Five weeks later, Nelson refiled the case there,[32] and the cases were combined.[33][34][35] As of April 2014, Warner's motion to dismiss had been denied without prejudice, and discovery began under an agreed plan with respect to Claim One, declaratory judgment as to whether "Happy Birthday to You" is in the public domain. The Motion Cut-Off as to Merits Issues on the Claim One deadline was November 7, 2014. After that, the court was expected to rule on the motion for summary judgment as to the merits issues on Claim One.[36] A jury trial was requested.[37]
My Plan, Do, Review kit continued to sell, but I had another collection of useful templates bubbling in my mind. Before I had even ever started this blog, I had been using a system called the Ultimate Life Binder as a way to keep track of my life. It was my central hub for setting goals, measuring my progress, and generally just being aware of where I was, where I was going, and what I was working on a day to day basis. It was comprised of life-management printables that I had printed out from my findings on the web and some that I had created myself to suit me even more personally. 
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