I have a story for you and it is not about how I suddenly woke up, decided I wanted to make a bunch of money on Etsy selling printables and became an overnight success. This is a story of how I sloowwwwlllllyyyyyy came to the realization that success on Etsy as a "Printables girl" was POSSIBLE for me. Once I got to THAT point, then yes, things took off from there. But, let's start at the beginning...
In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, it is traditional for one of the guests to enthusiastically lead with "Hip hip ..." and then for all of the other guests to join in and say "... hooray!" This is normally repeated three times. In Canada, especially at young children's birthdays, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, the singers segue into "How old are you now? How old are you now? How old are you now-ow, how old are you now?" and then count up: "Are you one? Are you two? Are you ..." until they reach the right age, at which the celebrant says "yes", and everybody else, who presumably know the right number, all cheer.[citation needed]
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.

This card has optional greetings: Happy Birthday!, Happy Belated Birthday!, Thank You!, Thinking of You!, Just Saying Hi!, Get Well Soon!, Bon Voyage!, Have a Great Trip!, Merry Christmas!, Season's Greetings!, Happy Holidays!, Happy New Year!, Spring is Coming!, Welcome Spring!, Happy Spring!, Warm Wishes!, You're Invited!, Good Luck!, Congratulations!


As with editing tools, Macs have built-in sharing features you can access through your Apple account. When you save a file to your computer, you can use Finder to connect to social media or iCloud and share your projects from there. Because of this, most Mac greeting card applications don’t include features that let you share your finished cards to social media directly from the software.
Artist Notes: What a festive and fun way this card is to say Happy Birthday to all the special people in your life - whether friends, family or work associates. The card features a row of colorfully patterned and decorated candles, with diagonal stripes, polka dots, flowers and swirls on the candles of blue, green, pink and orange, on the black background. The result is a colorful line-up of candles, with flames atop, ready for the birthday celebration to begin. The hand lettered message, "Happy Birthday", is above the candle flames, in alternating brightly colored letters, that match the candle colors. The inside wording is "Hope your birthday sparkles!""
In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."
Have you ever thought to sell printables on Etsy as an extra source of income? Selling printables is easy to do and can be a great way to earn extra cash for bills, debt, or even the Christmas fund! In this post, we’ll talk about how to sell printables on Etsy, various styles of printables, and there’s a video full of tips and tricks at the bottom – so keep reading!
Canva is the best place to design greeting cards if you have a Mac, but you can also use it to create hundreds of other projects, including business cards, flyers, book covers and infographics. In addition to being stylish, Canva’s images are high quality – you can move them around and resize them to fit your design without causing pixilation or creating jagged edges. And if you can’t find the right graphic in its huge library or you want to share a personal photo, you can upload your own. However, Canva is missing some basic photo editing tools, including a cropping tool and a red-eye remover, so you need to edit your images before you upload them. Also, it doesn’t have templates for traditional multi-fold cards like those you find in stores. Instead, it has templates to create flat, postcard-style cards. Another potential drawback is Canva is a subscription service. However, it’s easy to cancel your membership, so depending on the scope of your projects, it can end up costing less than some of the other programs we tested. There is also a decent free version, though it includes limited access to graphics. The service’s excellent support pages make it easy to figure out which membership is right for you or your business – its support information is searchable and detailed.
A year passed. 2014 was drawing to a close and I had made a whopping total of...$186.00 Then, in December of 2014, I decided to put together something that was a little more exciting than a single page printable. I created what I called the "Plan, Do, Review" kit. It was super simple but useful, and yes - assembled painstakingly with Picmonkey. (Pssst! I no longer sell that kit in my Etsy store, but you can get it here for free with this secret link ;) >> Click HERE for the Plan, Do, Review kit.)
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