It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
A little bit about this print. The Christmas Carol is my husband’s favorite Christmas movie/book of all time. Every year around Christmas we are forced asked to watch every version of the movie. Some of my kids like this tradition, others do not (I fall into this category). But it’s becoming a tradition and when I saw this book in the digital library I had to use it.
The American copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" began to draw more attention with the passage of the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act in 1998. When the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Act in Eldred v. Ashcroft in 2003, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer specifically mentioned "Happy Birthday to You" in his dissenting opinion.[15] American law professor Robert Brauneis, who extensively researched the song, concluded in 2010 that "It is almost certainly no longer under copyright."[16] In 2013, based in large part on Brauneis's research, Good Morning to You Productions, a company producing a documentary about "Good Morning to All", sued Warner/Chappell for falsely claiming copyright to the song.[5][10] In September 2015, a federal judge declared that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim was invalid, ruling that the copyright registration applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, and not to its lyrics and melody. In 2016, Warner/Chappell settled for US $14 million, and the court declared that "Happy Birthday to You" was in the public domain.[17][18]
[Lyrics] Well butter my butt and call me a biscuit, you're lookin' better than a barbecued brisket. You're the cream of the crop and the salt of the earth so we're all celebratin' the day of your birth. You can charm the dew off the honeysuckle when folks are feelin' blue, you can make 'em chuckle. We'll be fancy prancin' until the chickens roost, until the cows are home and all the varmints have vamoosed. Now we feel plum tuckered from having so much fun, So you can stick a fork in us - it's lookin' like we're done. [Message] Happy Birthday

Cover Verse: There are in the end three things that last: faith, hope, and love, and the greatest of these is love. 1 Corinthians 13:13 Inside Verse: Though your heart must hold deep sadness right now, may it also hold the blessings of the love that will always be a part of you... Praying that God will comfort your heart, uplift your spirit, and carry you through this time of sadness.

Cover Verse: My Beautiful Friend Inside Verse: From the time you were born to this moment today, From the nice things you do to the warm things you say... From the smiles that you share and the help that you give, To the genuine joy in the life that you live... From inside to outside, your beauty shines through, And you make the world better by just being you. Happy Birthday
About FeltingNerdyandMore:  Hello! My name is Tamzon (…it rhymes with Samson). 😉 I’m a crazy stay-at-home Momma to 4 precocious little hellions (the oldest is currently 5). I enjoy spending my sporadic “Me Time” sketching and crafting, and especially love it when my crafts can serve a practical purpose…like keeping my children quietly occupied…giving me more Me Time…to make more practical crafts…to keep them occupied. It’s a beautiful cycle.   After spending more than 100 hours designing and creating felt quiet/busy books for mine and others toddlers, I decided to draft step-by-step tutorials so others could learn to make them too!  I hope you find something here in my shop that inspires you!
Hallmark birthday cards cover every age or milestone—from the cutest cards for first birthdays to 100th birthdays, we have a card for that! You'll also be able to browse Spanish birthday cards (including Quinceañera cards), plus a host of other languages, including French, Italian, Japanese and even Braille. We have hundreds of birthday gift ideas, as well as a huge selection of colorful birthday gift wrap and fun birthday party supplies like napkins and candles, so if you know someone who has a birthday coming up soon, make Hallmark your one-stop shop for all things birthday—minus the cake!
Another surprising video result:  Beth Anne found a tutorial video she created for her and Sarah's now-defunct Mommy blog on making cappuccinos at home with a frother.  That video has almost 5,000 views on it! Again, this video wasn't promoted in any way, it just sits on their Mommy blog which gets about 10-20 hits per day... so it's essentially dead.  The video is getting viewed because it's ranking for keyword phrases on Google and YouTube.
In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, it is traditional for one of the guests to enthusiastically lead with "Hip hip ..." and then for all of the other guests to join in and say "... hooray!" This is normally repeated three times. In Canada, especially at young children's birthdays, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, the singers segue into "How old are you now? How old are you now? How old are you now-ow, how old are you now?" and then count up: "Are you one? Are you two? Are you ..." until they reach the right age, at which the celebrant says "yes", and everybody else, who presumably know the right number, all cheer.[citation needed]
Every once in a while I'd add a new printable to my store - just single page downloads that I actually hobbled together with Picmonkey. Creating printables in Picmonkey was painstakingly slow work since it's really supposed to be used for graphic editing and creation, but at the time, Picmonkey was the only program I knew. *Fun fact, I'm a self-taught graphic designer and all I use is Picmonkey! 
I just started my Printables shop GrinandPrint in Etsy and I can’t even get one person to buy. Is it that there are so many shops now? I have a facebook page, instagram, Twitter etc. I utilize all of these including Pinterest. I can’t seem to get someone to even give me any feedback so I know what I am doing wrong. It is so frustrating. I would love to here what others think I’m doing wrong in my shop so I can make some changes. Great read though.

I happened to hit the store on a week where they have all of their open face frames on sale 50% off! So I grabbed this rustic frame for about $30. As soon as I saw it I knew exactly how I wanted to display all of these beautiful fall drawings. I also happened to have everything else I needed at home already (thank you girls), so it was just a matter of putting it all together!
On June 13, 2013, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Nelson filed a putative class action suit in federal court for the Southern District of New York against Warner/Chappell in the name of her production company, Good Morning to You Productions.[5] As part of a documentary she was making about the song and its history, she had paid US$1,500 to secure the rights. Her complaint relied heavily on Brauneis's research, seeking not only the return of her money but all royalties collected by the company from other filmmakers since 2009.[10][29][30] A week later a similar case was filed in the Central District of California, Rupa Marya v. Warner Chappell Music Inc, Case No. 2:13-cv-04460.[31] Five weeks later, Nelson refiled the case there,[32] and the cases were combined.[33][34][35] As of April 2014, Warner's motion to dismiss had been denied without prejudice, and discovery began under an agreed plan with respect to Claim One, declaratory judgment as to whether "Happy Birthday to You" is in the public domain. The Motion Cut-Off as to Merits Issues on the Claim One deadline was November 7, 2014. After that, the court was expected to rule on the motion for summary judgment as to the merits issues on Claim One.[36] A jury trial was requested.[37]
The three central schedules in most across the board utilise today are the Gregorian, Jewish, and Islamic calendars. The term date-book itself is taken from calendae, the term for the primary day of the month in the Roman timetable, identified with the verb calare "to get out", alluding to the "calling" of the new moon when it was first seen. Latin calendarium signified "account book, enroll" (as records were settled and obligations were gathered on the calends of every month). The Latin expression was embraced in Old French as calendier and from that point in Middle English as calendar by the thirteenth century (the spelling schedule is early current).
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