Cover Verse: Happy Birthday, Daughter If you can laugh often, love deeply, and let the dreams of your heart create your tomorrow... Inside Verse: If, no matter how busy life gets, you can find joy and wonder in the little things and a few quiet moments for yourself... If every day you feel as loved, as beautiful, as celebrated as you do today... Then you'll always know the kind of happiness a daughter like you deserves.
This is a fabulous Vintage Printable Bees print! This print comes from a Circa 1840 Natural History Bees Book. Featured above are three Beautiful Bees with very scientific names! I looked up Euglossa… and they are apparently also known as Orchid Bees. I love the rustic style of this print and the creamy monochromatic background ! I think this would look fabulous mixed in with your Spring or Summer Decor, perhaps under a glass cloche or behind the panes of an Old Window! You can find a similar print from the same book HERE.
None of the early appearances of the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics included credits or copyright notices. The Summy Company registered a copyright in 1935, crediting authors Preston Ware Orem and Mrs. R. R. Forman. In 1988, Warner/Chappell Music purchased the company owning the copyright for US$25 million, with the value of "Happy Birthday" estimated at US$5 million.[10][11] Based on the 1935 copyright registration, Warner claimed that the United States copyright will not expire until 2030, and that unauthorized public performances of the song are illegal unless royalties are paid to Warner. In one specific instance in February 2010, the royalty for a single use was said to be US$700.[12] By one estimate, the song is the highest-earning single song in history.[13] In the European Union, the copyright for the song expired on January 1, 2017.[14]

Warner/Chappell disputed the evidence, arguing that unless there was "necessary authorization from the copyright owner", the "Happy Birthday" lyrics and sheet music would still be subject to common law copyright as an unpublished work, and that it was unknown whether the "special permission" from the Summy Company covered "Good Morning to All", "Happy Birthday", or both, thus alleging that the publication in The Everyday Song Book was unauthorized. The company also argued that it was not acting in bad faith in withholding the evidence of the 1927 publication.[39]
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
I sell physical prints mostly out of the fear of someone reselling. Like you said, they could still do that with a physical copy by scanning but at least that’s a little more of a hassle. I’d also hate to see my art printed on shitty paper or the colors are completely off because the buyer (or print service they use) doesn’t put in the effort to get the colors just right.
I have a story for you and it is not about how I suddenly woke up, decided I wanted to make a bunch of money on Etsy selling printables and became an overnight success. This is a story of how I sloowwwwlllllyyyyyy came to the realization that success on Etsy as a "Printables girl" was POSSIBLE for me. Once I got to THAT point, then yes, things took off from there. But, let's start at the beginning...
About AdorablyGrown:  Hi there! My name is Dora. I am an avid gardener, living on a small organic farm in the Northwest Hills of Connecticut.  After a career-related move to the northeast, I fell in love with a hay farmer and moved to the country! Transitioning from a tiny urban garden to a small farm truly put my gardening skills to the test. But, we continue to grow and improve each year. Many of the items in the shop are a direct result of the tools and resources we created to manage our garden and other chores around the farm.
Cover Verse: Happy Birthday, Daughter If you can laugh often, love deeply, and let the dreams of your heart create your tomorrow... Inside Verse: If, no matter how busy life gets, you can find joy and wonder in the little things and a few quiet moments for yourself... If every day you feel as loved, as beautiful, as celebrated as you do today... Then you'll always know the kind of happiness a daughter like you deserves.

I love to cook and decided that I need a recipe card box out of sheer hatred for the add-filled, biographical oubliettes that food websites have become. I'm not using microsoft word, so i didnt even bother trying to download the templates, but I just set the page format to center on the measurements of the cards and everything printed predictably. My printer had no trouble with the card stock and I didn't even have to change the settings, which is great because I totally forgot to check that.
The printables I was adding to my store at that time were very inexpensive - I charged $3 at most. Throughout the month, I'd make a sale here and there. My phone had the Etsy Seller app downloaded onto it and the app would notify me of a sale by making an AMAZING "cha-ching!!" sound. I loved it even though I only made enough to pay for my fancy lattes here and there.
One more of my vintage illustrations: this time shabby-looking old fashioned retro photo camera. Illustration is based on my father's old Fujifilm finepix x100 camera. I had never used  this camera, I prefer instant digital photos. I can't imaging paying on each and every photo, just to see it. But I like vintage things and vintage clip art and I enjoy to share my finds. 
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