This is where Pinterest came in. I decided that I was going to use Pinterest as my marketing platform. I wasn't going to spread myself thin across multiple social media arenas. I was going to focus on one, and I knew that Pinterest was the right one for me because it was where I went when I was hungry for printables, so I was familiar with how I could leverage it for my own. Also, Pinterest has this magic fairy dust that is great for businesses - it puts its users in a take-action/shopping frame of mind. When people are on Pinterest, they are typically there because they want to improve some aspect of their life. They are looking for solutions, which often results in a purchase. 

As we tested each program, we evaluated the quantity and quality of the graphics and templates it includes. To check clip art quality, we flipped, rotated, resized and recolored images. Both during the design process and after we printed our final designs, we made sure the graphics retained their shape and that they didn’t pixelate or have jagged edges. We also uploaded our own pictures to create personalized designs and to make sure the programs didn’t distort or corrupt our files.


More than 100 years ago Thermos used to be called a Dewar flask or Dewar bottle after its inventor  Scottish physicist and chemist Sir James Dewar. He invented it in 1892, but in 1904 lost a court case in claiming the rights to the invention to German company, Thermos GmbH, who started commertial production of vacuum flasks by the brand name "Thermos".

About BossLadyPrintables:  I’ve been a project and program manager for over 10 years now, with a diverse background working in multiple Fortune 500 companies. I became interested in creating career-focused printables after searching Etsy for specific types of files and coming up empty. I was looking for digital downloads that I felt were professional enough for a formal office setting and that I could use confidently, with clean and modern design elements.


Send a FREE Birthday eCard to a friend or family member! Send free Birthday ecards to your friends and family quickly and easily on CrossCards.com. Share an animated Birthday eCard or a cute and funny ecard with your family and friends, it’s easy! Find that perfect Birthday card, add a personalized message, then press send! That's all it takes to brighten the day of a friend with a FREE eCard! CrossCards.com – Free Christian inspired online greeting cards.
Telling your mom happy birthday with meaningful birthday greeting cards has literally never been easier (really, we’re in a new age here). Just choose your favorite card (we know it can all be overwhelming, just go with your gut on this one), write your personal message, and hit send. Didn’t we say it was easy? Never go to the post office again. Send a birthday card online with Postable and your friends will love you! And just so you never forget another birthday again, make sure your birthday alerts are turned on.
Since every individual is different, you need a birthday card that's as unique as they are, and with nearly 200,000 cards to choose from, you're sure to find one that speaks their language for a birthday greeting they'll always remember. Offering exclusive designs to suit every style from humorous and heartfelt to age specific and theme related, you can find the right birthday card for anyone. To go the extra mile, you can even customize your cards with personalized text and photos, and for that birthday you almost forgot, we have you covered as cards ship the next day or can be printed at your local Target store.
Cover Verse: There are in the end three things that last: faith, hope, and love, and the greatest of these is love. 1 Corinthians 13:13 Inside Verse: Though your heart must hold deep sadness right now, may it also hold the blessings of the love that will always be a part of you... Praying that God will comfort your heart, uplift your spirit, and carry you through this time of sadness.
About PatternsbyGwen:  Hi my name is Gwen. I’m a 27 year old who grew up loving all crafts.  I started doing stained glass at age 24 when I moved to a big city and took an intro to stained glass class at the local art center. I was hooked! I have a number of other hobbies that I mean to tie in with stained glass. It captures my imagination like no other medium!
In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."
On July 28, 2015, one day prior to a scheduled ruling, Nelson's attorneys Betsy Manifold and Mark Rifkin presented new evidence that they argued was conclusive proof that the song was in the public domain, "thus making it unnecessary for the Court to decide the scope or validity of the disputed copyrights, much less whether Patty Hill abandoned any copyright she may have had to the lyrics". Several weeks prior, they had been given access to documents held back from them by Warner/Chappell, which included a copy of the 15th edition of The Everyday Song Book, published in 1927. The book contained "Good Morning and Happy Birthday", but the copy was blurry, obscuring a line of text below the title. Manifold and Rifkin located a clearer copy of an older edition, published in 1922, that also contained the "Happy Birthday" lyrics. The previously obscured line was revealed to be the credit "Special permission through courtesy of The Clayton F Summy Co.". Manifold and Rifkin argued that because the music and lyrics were published without a valid copyright notice as was required at the time, "Happy Birthday" was in the public domain.[38]
The documentary film The Corporation states that Warner/Chappell charged up to US$10,000 for the song to appear in a film. Because of the copyright issue, filmmakers rarely showed complete singalongs of "Happy Birthday" in films, either substituting the public-domain "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" or avoiding using a song entirely. Before the song was copyrighted it was used freely, as in Bosko's Party, a Warner Bros. cartoon of 1932, where a chorus of animals sings it twice through. The copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" is directly referenced in a 2009 episode of the TV series iCarly, "iMake Sam Girlier", in which the main character as well as others begin to sing the song to Sam but are prevented from doing so by Freddie, who says the song isn't public domain; "For She's a Jolly Good Fellow" is then sung instead.
The shops look great! Something I may need to look into further! My friend had a bachelorette party last weekend and her sister bought everyone bride tribe tattoos and there was a scavenger hunt. Based on your post, I think she she bought them from you, small world! Long time blog reader and podcast listener and I just love you and Gwen. Thanks for being awesome!
The three central schedules in most across the board utilise today are the Gregorian, Jewish, and Islamic calendars. The term date-book itself is taken from calendae, the term for the primary day of the month in the Roman timetable, identified with the verb calare "to get out", alluding to the "calling" of the new moon when it was first seen. Latin calendarium signified "account book, enroll" (as records were settled and obligations were gathered on the calends of every month). The Latin expression was embraced in Old French as calendier and from that point in Middle English as calendar by the thirteenth century (the spelling schedule is early current).
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