This feature is another game changer.  When you start building up several files in your Silhouette library, sometimes you want to get a glimpse of a file or recall who the original designer was.  You can now double click on the small thumbnail and it expands to a pop out screen with all the pertinent info and details.  What a timesaver.  With a slider button, you can expand or decrease the thumbnails in this preview panel.  Enhancing visibility when you have multiple files to look through is another huge enhancement.  This feature gets a 5 star rating.
I usually offer PDFs at 8×10 (U.S. standard frame size) or 8.5×11 (U.S. letter size). Let’s assume we’re starting with a PDF in one of those sizes, and let’s assume you aren’t using Photoshop (highly recommended!) or a comparable file-handling app. Printing the PDF from default programs (Reader, Preview, Word) should give you a dialogue box that allows you to adjust sizing by percentage.
If you don’t have a print at home option just save the JPEG files to your computer and upload them onto a site like walgreens.com to print them online. They are specifically formatted to fit into an 8×10 inch frame. If you want to and know you you are certainly welcome to change the size although printing quality my be reduced at sizes larger than 8×10
Prior to the lawsuit, Warner/Chappell had been earning $2 million a year licensing the song for commercial use,[44] with a notable example the $5,000 paid by the filmmakers of the 1994 documentary, Hoop Dreams,[47] in order to safely distribute the film.[48] On February 8, 2016, Warner/Chappell agreed to pay a settlement of $14 million to those who had licensed the song, and would allow a final judgment declaring the song to be in the public domain, with a final hearing scheduled in March 2016.[49][50] On June 28, 2016, the final settlement was officially granted and the court declared that the song was in the public domain.[18] The following week, Nelson's short-form documentary, Happy Birthday: my campaign to liberate the people's song, was published online by The Guardian.[51]

Our birthday card and gift selection allows you to easily browse birthday gifts for him, birthday gifts for her, and birthday gifts for kids. If you prefer to shop a different way, you can browse by type of gift, including categories such as home decor, kitchen goods and personalized books, among others. For special milestone birthdays, we offer specific gifts and cards to personalize their day even more!

In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."
On July 28, 2015, one day prior to a scheduled ruling, Nelson's attorneys Betsy Manifold and Mark Rifkin presented new evidence that they argued was conclusive proof that the song was in the public domain, "thus making it unnecessary for the Court to decide the scope or validity of the disputed copyrights, much less whether Patty Hill abandoned any copyright she may have had to the lyrics". Several weeks prior, they had been given access to documents held back from them by Warner/Chappell, which included a copy of the 15th edition of The Everyday Song Book, published in 1927. The book contained "Good Morning and Happy Birthday", but the copy was blurry, obscuring a line of text below the title. Manifold and Rifkin located a clearer copy of an older edition, published in 1922, that also contained the "Happy Birthday" lyrics. The previously obscured line was revealed to be the credit "Special permission through courtesy of The Clayton F Summy Co.". Manifold and Rifkin argued that because the music and lyrics were published without a valid copyright notice as was required at the time, "Happy Birthday" was in the public domain.[38]
Numbers nerd. Guilty. I have always completely geeked out when working in Excel and creating spreadsheets that provide the information I need quickly and easily. I hate wasting my time in activities that do not add value and focus my efforts on being efficient as possible. My desire is to help others do the same! The files I create are tailored to the spreadsheet novice and do all the calculating for you. They are also always formatting to print out just right in case you need a hard copy.
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