First, you will need to do at least a Google search, words and/or image, to be sure you won’t run into any copyright or trademark issues. You can also search records at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office online and the Copyright Office online. It may sound silly, but it could end up costing you a lot of time or money if your idea is infringing on someone else’s work.
If you don’t have a print at home option just save the JPEG files to your computer and upload them onto a site like walgreens.com to print them online. They are specifically formatted to fit into an 8×10 inch frame. If you want to and know you you are certainly welcome to change the size although printing quality my be reduced at sizes larger than 8×10
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
"Happy Birthday to You", also known as "Happy Birthday", is a song traditionally sung to celebrate the anniversary of a person's birth. According to the 1998 Guinness World Records, it is the most recognized song in the English language, followed by "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow". The song's base lyrics have been translated into at least 18 languages.[1] The melody of "Happy Birthday to You" comes from the song "Good Morning to All",[2] which has traditionally been attributed to American sisters Patty and Mildred J. Hill in 1893,[3][4] although the claim that the sisters composed the tune is disputed.[5]

On September 22, 2015, federal judge George H. King ruled[40] that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim over the lyrics was invalid.[41][42] The 1935 copyright held by Warner/Chappell applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, not the lyrics or melody.[43] The court held that the question of whether the 1922 and 1927 publications were authorized, thus placing the song in the public domain, presented questions of fact that would need to be resolved at trial.[40] However, Warner/Chappell had failed to prove that it actually had ever held a copyright to the lyrics, so the court was able to grant summary judgment to the plaintiffs, thus resolving the case.[40]
The real kick in the backside came as I approached the middle of the year. I was getting closer and closer to the Fall season - a time when I knew that I had two big trips coming up - one to Europe and one to the States. I'm a traveling girl. I get on the plane at least once a year. However, this time, I was ready to write a slightly different story for myself. I was ready to feel differently about myself. I had a picture in my mind and in it, I was sitting in a cafe in Paris drinking a latte and feeling successful, feeling at peace because I had a business that was making money even while I was on vacation.
My Plan, Do, Review kit continued to sell, but I had another collection of useful templates bubbling in my mind. Before I had even ever started this blog, I had been using a system called the Ultimate Life Binder as a way to keep track of my life. It was my central hub for setting goals, measuring my progress, and generally just being aware of where I was, where I was going, and what I was working on a day to day basis. It was comprised of life-management printables that I had printed out from my findings on the web and some that I had created myself to suit me even more personally. 
Another surprising video result:  Beth Anne found a tutorial video she created for her and Sarah's now-defunct Mommy blog on making cappuccinos at home with a frother.  That video has almost 5,000 views on it! Again, this video wasn't promoted in any way, it just sits on their Mommy blog which gets about 10-20 hits per day… so it's essentially dead.  The video is getting viewed because it's ranking for keyword phrases on Google and YouTube.
This feature is another plus factor in this edition of the Silhouette software.  Under the Help menu, you can get a pull down box that gives you a list of the skills you want to learn in the software with a note on  on it’s complexity.  When you click on the video tutorial, a small pop up box expands from the left side with step-by-step gif instructions of the skill you want to learn.  You can also click thru to view the actual Silhouette Studio video on Youtube.  I will rate this feature 5 stars.
Poinsettia is one of the most associated plants with Christmas in North America. It's Christmas history began in Mexico in 16 century. According to the legend, one poor girl had nothing else to bring to a church as a gift to celebrate Jesus birthday, except wild weeds. But miracle happened and crimson flower sprouted from the weeds. In Mexico Poinsettia is called "La Flor de la Nochebuena", which means Flower of the Christmas Eve or Flower of the Holy Night. But common english name "Poinsettia" came from the name of the the first United States Minister to Mexico, Joel Roberts Poinsett. In 1825 he was the first who brought this plant into the United States.
In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, it is traditional for one of the guests to enthusiastically lead with "Hip hip ..." and then for all of the other guests to join in and say "... hooray!" This is normally repeated three times. In Canada, especially at young children's birthdays, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, the singers segue into "How old are you now? How old are you now? How old are you now-ow, how old are you now?" and then count up: "Are you one? Are you two? Are you ..." until they reach the right age, at which the celebrant says "yes", and everybody else, who presumably know the right number, all cheer.[citation needed]
When you sit down with a blank greeting card in front of you, don’t be surprised if you can’t seem to put the pen to paper. Many of us get a case of writers block when we sit down to write a birthday card greeting, especially to the people we love the most. Sure, the birthday honoree knows just how much you love and appreciate him or her but, it doesn’t hurt to remind them on their day.
1) The easiest way to use this printout  is to print it out on a full sheet of white sticker paper and if you own a Silhouette Cameo or Silhouette Portrait or other digital cutter you can cut out the to-do lists or planner stickers using their designer software. ( **Please note:  You must have the Silhouette Designer Edition software upgrade to open pdfs in your Silhouette. I also have redesigned the template so that the margins are within the “registration” area of your silhouette.   You will have to spend some time creating the cutlines for the silhouette  but this should make creating the cutfile a lot easier.)
Still, if you prefer to use your own photos and images and want to create quarter- or half-fold cards, Greeting Box may be a good fit. Since Greeting Box doesn’t have photo editing tools, you need to use another application, such as Apple’s Photos, to correct red-eye and crop images before you upload them. Once the images are in the software, you can only drag, layer, rotate and reverse them. There’s also a transparency option, but compared to Hallmark Card Studio’s design suite, which includes more effects and filters, Greeting Box’s tools are very basic. This program’s biggest benefit is its price – it only costs $9.99. Other greeting cards programs cost between $40.00 and $50.00. Our best pick, Canva, is a subscription service with a fee that, over time, can make it cost even more. While Canva has a limited free version, it can be frustrating to only have access to some of the features and graphics, and Greeting Box gives you full access with your initial download. Also, you can order more clip art directly from Greeting Box for a few extra dollars.
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