Patty Hill was a kindergarten principal in Louisville, Kentucky, developing various teaching methods at what is now the Little Loomhouse;[6] her sister Mildred was a pianist and composer.[7] The sisters used "Good Morning to All" as a song that young children would find easy to sing.[8] The combination of melody and lyrics in "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print in 1912, and probably existed even earlier.[9]
Pinterest is a great way to market your products, especially on Etsy. Pinterest is a very visual platform and having beautiful pictures of your product in pins is a great way to get some clicks to your shop and products that will hopefully convert into sales! Word of mouth is great too! Tell friends, family, and it’s a good idea to whip up some business cards for your Etsy shop that you can hand out to people you meet if it comes up in conversation.
Hi Angie! Just wanted to contact you about using a couple of your vintage portraits on our church website. We’re doing a promotion for our church directory, trying to encourage folks to get in and get their photos taken and I wanted to do a slide using the couple that could be a wedding photo and the one of the grandma in the garden. While it’s not exactly a “commercial” use, it’s a little more than a “personal” use so I wanted to be sure and have permission before using them! I’m a big fan of your blog and Facebook page and have gained so much inspiration from you! Thanks so much!
Hey there!! I wanted to thank you again for including a collection of my printables in your collection :o) I recently moved to WordPress & you can no longer get to those printables from the link above…I was curious if you could update it as your site is one of my BIGGEST referrers for which I am so grateful! I couldn’t find a way to contact you so I hope this comment finds it way! Happy New Year…
A great tip Sarah shared was to encourage independence in smaller children so they can be playing alone and entertained at least for a short time while you do some work. Sarah has been able to achieve her goal of making a part-time income on her own terms with lots of flexibility. Although she tries to continually create new products, she knows that her business was built to allow for flexibility and put her family first.  So Sarah doesn't stress if she can't add new products for a while.  Her business works for her - not the other way around! 

Print everything from flash cards and recipe cards to promotional cards and contact cards in a few simple steps with Avery Index Cards. The 3 inch x 5 inch cards are easy to design and print yourself using free printable designs and index card templates on the official website. Just personalize your template and print as many as you need. The micro-perforations make it easy to separate your cards quickly and cleanly, so you’re ready to get back to work in no time. Great for students, teachers, home and office use.

None of the early appearances of the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics included credits or copyright notices. The Summy Company registered a copyright in 1935, crediting authors Preston Ware Orem and Mrs. R. R. Forman. In 1988, Warner/Chappell Music purchased the company owning the copyright for US$25 million, with the value of "Happy Birthday" estimated at US$5 million.[10][11] Based on the 1935 copyright registration, Warner claimed that the United States copyright will not expire until 2030, and that unauthorized public performances of the song are illegal unless royalties are paid to Warner. In one specific instance in February 2010, the royalty for a single use was said to be US$700.[12] By one estimate, the song is the highest-earning single song in history.[13] In the European Union, the copyright for the song expired on January 1, 2017.[14]


This feature is another game changer.  When you start building up several files in your Silhouette library, sometimes you want to get a glimpse of a file or recall who the original designer was.  You can now double click on the small thumbnail and it expands to a pop out screen with all the pertinent info and details.  What a timesaver.  With a slider button, you can expand or decrease the thumbnails in this preview panel.  Enhancing visibility when you have multiple files to look through is another huge enhancement.  This feature gets a 5 star rating.
Hi, I love looking at all of your post and have printed and used some of them, they are just wonderful and I love looking at all the pictures. I am subscribed to your site but do not get your post in my email anymore. I did get them and then a few months back they stopped coming. I have a yahoo email do you think that has anything to do with it? Is there another way I can get them sent right to me instead of finding them on other sites?
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
Warner/Chappell Music acquired Birch Tree Group Limited in 1988 for US$25 million.[10][11] The company continued to insist that one cannot sing the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics for profit without paying royalties: in 2008, Warner collected about US$5,000 per day (US$2 million per year) in royalties for the song.[27] Warner/Chappell claimed copyright for every use in film, television, radio, anywhere open to the public, and for any group where a substantial number of those in attendance are not family or friends of whoever is performing the song. Brauneis cited problems with the song's authorship and the notice and renewal of the copyright, and concluded: "It is almost certainly no longer under copyright."[3][16]
Another surprising video result:  Beth Anne found a tutorial video she created for her and Sarah's now-defunct Mommy blog on making cappuccinos at home with a frother.  That video has almost 5,000 views on it! Again, this video wasn't promoted in any way, it just sits on their Mommy blog which gets about 10-20 hits per day... so it's essentially dead.  The video is getting viewed because it's ranking for keyword phrases on Google and YouTube.
I have a bit of a 'vintage ephemera' obsession of late.  I am in love with the pretty journals I see on Instagram that use old botany/floral images and vintage ladies.  So I have had a look around the internet and found the ten best free vintage ephemera printables / digi scraps sites for use in your planners, smash books, journals, collage art, mixed media and scrapbooks. Have fun browsing, scrapping and journaling through my 10 favourite ephemera freebie sites.
Poinsettia is one of the most associated plants with Christmas in North America. It's Christmas history began in Mexico in 16 century. According to the legend, one poor girl had nothing else to bring to a church as a gift to celebrate Jesus birthday, except wild weeds. But miracle happened and crimson flower sprouted from the weeds. In Mexico Poinsettia is called "La Flor de la Nochebuena", which means Flower of the Christmas Eve or Flower of the Holy Night. But common english name "Poinsettia" came from the name of the the first United States Minister to Mexico, Joel Roberts Poinsett. In 1825 he was the first who brought this plant into the United States.

We downloaded the available Mac greeting card programs – there are only six we could find that keep their software up to date and seemed safe to download – and tested them over the course of several weeks. In total, we spent about 40 hours designing cards and playing with the programs’ features so we could make well-informed comparisons between them. We created some event and holiday cards from scratch and with the provided templates. In each program, we also made invitations to a summer ice cream party to see if the software could help us make the designs we had in our heads a reality.


Still, if you prefer to use your own photos and images and want to create quarter- or half-fold cards, Greeting Box may be a good fit. Since Greeting Box doesn’t have photo editing tools, you need to use another application, such as Apple’s Photos, to correct red-eye and crop images before you upload them. Once the images are in the software, you can only drag, layer, rotate and reverse them. There’s also a transparency option, but compared to Hallmark Card Studio’s design suite, which includes more effects and filters, Greeting Box’s tools are very basic. This program’s biggest benefit is its price – it only costs $9.99. Other greeting cards programs cost between $40.00 and $50.00. Our best pick, Canva, is a subscription service with a fee that, over time, can make it cost even more. While Canva has a limited free version, it can be frustrating to only have access to some of the features and graphics, and Greeting Box gives you full access with your initial download. Also, you can order more clip art directly from Greeting Box for a few extra dollars.
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