If something is a HUGE seller for you and it is not evergreen, then for sure it is worth updating frequently yourself or by hiring a Virtual Assistant to help. I am not saying you should make everything evergreen or not, just that if you want to keep it truly passive it is best to pick something that is going to stay “in fashion” for quite a while.
As with editing tools, Macs have built-in sharing features you can access through your Apple account. When you save a file to your computer, you can use Finder to connect to social media or iCloud and share your projects from there. Because of this, most Mac greeting card applications don’t include features that let you share your finished cards to social media directly from the software.

Do you have a blog? or have you thought of finding blogs in your niche to offer free printables to/ credit to your shop for review on their blog? possibly offer to do some work for a few blogs (a few freebies) in exchange put at bottom of printable (designed by GrinandPrint for Barefoot Budgeting) with your link in print? Also, twitter!! Instagram is really your best form of media for printables in my opinion but touching on them all and don’t give up. I’ve heard that the more you have in your shop and great key words (check your competition) are also great ways to increase views 🙂 Keep in touch if you think I can be of any assistance with any of these.
If you’re celebrating a birthday boy, you’ll find cards with charming animal illustrations and adventurous forest landscapes perfect for the plucky lad in your life (and all his future derring-do). Those entering their quarter- or mid-life crises deserve a card featuring sharp suiting, refined cocktails, and other trappings of fashionable maturity—it’s not so bad, we swear. Toast or roast the distinguished older gentleman in your life with funny birthday cards for men that make light of all those extra candles on the cake. Dry wit from The New Yorker and Derek Blasberg keeps the comedy fit for an evening at the Cafe Carlyle. Gents of any age will appreciate a card that features frosted gateaus, cream cakes, and other edible birthday indulgences. If you’d prefer to focus on the memories, a photo birthday card with an elegant typographic design or border frame lets you send a particularly sweet portrait of your jolly good fellow as you remember him best.
The eyedropper tool copies the color of any single pixel in the editing window and allows you to auto-populate a color wheel and create a custom palette. There’s also a photo analyzer tool to help you identify the dominant color in a photo to make a more informed design choice. Using these advanced editing tools takes some practice, but once you figure them out, you can create high-quality and customized cards from scratch. The biggest downside of this program is the lack of templates and graphics. Although, the included graphics are high-quality and showed no signs of distortion or pixilation when we moved and resized them to fit our test designs. This is a great greeting card software if you have basic design skills and want to create customized cards from scratch.
I’m so sorry about that and yes, it’s because you have Yahoo email, they have been blocking my emails along with many other bloggers. I’ve been working on a fix for this for weeks now and I think we finally have it corrected!! Hopefully you will have an email in your box from me today, in about half and hour our so. If you don’t, please let me know! I really want to get this fixed for everyone!

I have a story for you and it is not about how I suddenly woke up, decided I wanted to make a bunch of money on Etsy selling printables and became an overnight success. This is a story of how I sloowwwwlllllyyyyyy came to the realization that success on Etsy as a "Printables girl" was POSSIBLE for me. Once I got to THAT point, then yes, things took off from there. But, let's start at the beginning...


Have you ever thought to sell printables on Etsy as an extra source of income? Selling printables is easy to do and can be a great way to earn extra cash for bills, debt, or even the Christmas fund! In this post, we’ll talk about how to sell printables on Etsy, various styles of printables, and there’s a video full of tips and tricks at the bottom – so keep reading!

Also, if you are new to this site, I wanted to let you know  that I have a board on Pinterest  that  you might want to follow that has several pins (ideas) by other planner designers, stationery, home office decor,  office supplies and planner freebies that are mostly planner related, you can view that board and/or follow here,  Home Office | Planners & Stationery Favs.

The documentary film The Corporation states that Warner/Chappell charged up to US$10,000 for the song to appear in a film. Because of the copyright issue, filmmakers rarely showed complete singalongs of "Happy Birthday" in films, either substituting the public-domain "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" or avoiding using a song entirely. Before the song was copyrighted it was used freely, as in Bosko's Party, a Warner Bros. cartoon of 1932, where a chorus of animals sings it twice through. The copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" is directly referenced in a 2009 episode of the TV series iCarly, "iMake Sam Girlier", in which the main character as well as others begin to sing the song to Sam but are prevented from doing so by Freddie, who says the song isn't public domain; "For She's a Jolly Good Fellow" is then sung instead.
In 1935, several specific piano arrangements and an unused second verse of "Happy Birthday to You" were copyrighted as a work for hire crediting Preston Ware Orem for the piano arrangements and Mrs. R. R. Forman for the lyrics by the Summy Company, the publisher of "Good Morning to All".[24][25] This served as the legal basis for claiming that Summy Company legally registered the copyright for the song, as well as the later renewal of these copyrights.[26] A later 2015 lawsuit would find this claim baseless. That specific new lyrics that also included the full text of "Happy Birthday to You", was a copyright on the derivative work. A 1957 acquisition of C.C. Birchard & Company saw Summy Company becoming the Summy-Birchard Company. A later corporate restructuring in the 1970s saw Summy-Birchard becoming a division of a new company: Birch Tree Group Limited.
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
"Happy Birthday to You", also known as "Happy Birthday", is a song traditionally sung to celebrate the anniversary of a person's birth. According to the 1998 Guinness World Records, it is the most recognized song in the English language, followed by "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow". The song's base lyrics have been translated into at least 18 languages.[1] The melody of "Happy Birthday to You" comes from the song "Good Morning to All",[2] which has traditionally been attributed to American sisters Patty and Mildred J. Hill in 1893,[3][4] although the claim that the sisters composed the tune is disputed.[5]
In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."
*If you post this on the internet, please give credit to Vintage Glam Studio & link back to my blog (www.vintageglamstudio.com), so others can obtain the resources.  Pinterest, Twitter and Facebook are great social media sharing platforms, it’s the  sharing without a link back that can be a problem. If you use this printable on Instagram, tag me with #vintageglamstudio or @vintageglamstudio. Thanks!
Definitely an idea but less time consuming to do just one or the other. Also I'm thinking of the confusion for the customer. From what I see some digital download shop owners will offer physical prints but they do it as a "blank" store item customers can buy and then reference the image they want printed so I might do that. Do you sell digital downloads or physical prints?
The American copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" began to draw more attention with the passage of the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act in 1998. When the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Act in Eldred v. Ashcroft in 2003, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer specifically mentioned "Happy Birthday to You" in his dissenting opinion.[15] American law professor Robert Brauneis, who extensively researched the song, concluded in 2010 that "It is almost certainly no longer under copyright."[16] In 2013, based in large part on Brauneis's research, Good Morning to You Productions, a company producing a documentary about "Good Morning to All", sued Warner/Chappell for falsely claiming copyright to the song.[5][10] In September 2015, a federal judge declared that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim was invalid, ruling that the copyright registration applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, and not to its lyrics and melody. In 2016, Warner/Chappell settled for US $14 million, and the court declared that "Happy Birthday to You" was in the public domain.[17][18]

Anymore, the price of a card can nearly equal a premium coffee, so “free” is a breath of fresh air, and you won’t encounter fine print exceptions or surprise fees. Complete your Printable Card project using your home printer or send your creation as an eCard from our site via email or Facebook from your computer, phone, or tablet. You can even download the image or PDF file and save it to portable storage media, if you’d like to take your design to a local shop for printing. As always, there’s no charge from us.

Hello planner fans.  I have been wanting to design these for the longest time, since they are more of a planner accessory rather than planner stickers and I hadn’t found the right digital paper for these tab dividers.  I think you might enjoy these foldable tab dividers, for either your art journaling, planner organization or bible journaling or other papercrafting use.
One more of my vintage illustrations: this time shabby-looking old fashioned retro photo camera. Illustration is based on my father's old Fujifilm finepix x100 camera. I had never used  this camera, I prefer instant digital photos. I can't imaging paying on each and every photo, just to see it. But I like vintage things and vintage clip art and I enjoy to share my finds. 
A couple of years ago, I shared this post about an incredible resource for printing vintage botanical art prints – Botanicus – the free, Web-based encyclopedia of digitized botanical literature from the Missouri Botanical Garden Library.  When I found that resource, I couldn’t believe how many incredible and totally free images were just out there on the web to be printed and framed.  It’s a budget decorator’s dream!  I really didn’t think it could get any better – BUT IT JUST DID!
This card has optional greetings: Happy Mother's Day!, Happy Birthday!, Happy Spring!, Thinking of You!, Thank You!, Get Well Soon!, Happy Anniversary!, Happy Summer!, Happy Gardening!, Have a Nice Day!, Just Saying Hi!, Warm Wishes!, Congratulations!, Good Luck!, You're Invited!, Spring is in the Air!, Welcome Spring!, Happy Easter!, Happy Valentine's Day!, Happy Belated Birthday!, [No Caption]
While it’s convenient to be able to find, upload, edit and incorporate images into your designs all in one space, none of the programs we reviewed have the full package of tools we looked for. As such, if you’re a dedicated Mac user, we recommend choosing greeting card design software based on the quality and style of its graphics rather than on its photo editing tools. If you also have a PC, you can check out our reviews of the best Windows-compatible greeting card programs, which have a better balance of editing tools and graphics.
My Plan, Do, Review kit continued to sell, but I had another collection of useful templates bubbling in my mind. Before I had even ever started this blog, I had been using a system called the Ultimate Life Binder as a way to keep track of my life. It was my central hub for setting goals, measuring my progress, and generally just being aware of where I was, where I was going, and what I was working on a day to day basis. It was comprised of life-management printables that I had printed out from my findings on the web and some that I had created myself to suit me even more personally. 
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