*If you post this on the internet, please give credit to Vintage Glam Studio & link back to my blog (www.vintageglamstudio.com), so others can obtain the resources.  Pinterest, Twitter and Facebook are great social media sharing platforms, it’s the  sharing without a link back that can be a problem. If you use this printable on Instagram, tag me with #vintageglamstudio or @vintageglamstudio. Thanks!
None of the early appearances of the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics included credits or copyright notices. The Summy Company registered a copyright in 1935, crediting authors Preston Ware Orem and Mrs. R. R. Forman. In 1988, Warner/Chappell Music purchased the company owning the copyright for US$25 million, with the value of "Happy Birthday" estimated at US$5 million.[10][11] Based on the 1935 copyright registration, Warner claimed that the United States copyright will not expire until 2030, and that unauthorized public performances of the song are illegal unless royalties are paid to Warner. In one specific instance in February 2010, the royalty for a single use was said to be US$700.[12] By one estimate, the song is the highest-earning single song in history.[13] In the European Union, the copyright for the song expired on January 1, 2017.[14]
The three central schedules in most across the board utilise today are the Gregorian, Jewish, and Islamic calendars. The term date-book itself is taken from calendae, the term for the primary day of the month in the Roman timetable, identified with the verb calare "to get out", alluding to the "calling" of the new moon when it was first seen. Latin calendarium signified "account book, enroll" (as records were settled and obligations were gathered on the calends of every month). The Latin expression was embraced in Old French as calendier and from that point in Middle English as calendar by the thirteenth century (the spelling schedule is early current). 

Don’t know how, but I just came across your blog and I am having a ball looking around at all the wonderful images you have posted. You really inspire me, because I too am a country gal and from one country woman to another, you have great ideas and taste!! I want to thank you for all the “free bees”. You are very kind and generous. I have no doubt some of the things I see are going to end up in my home!

A year passed. 2014 was drawing to a close and I had made a whopping total of...$186.00 Then, in December of 2014, I decided to put together something that was a little more exciting than a single page printable. I created what I called the "Plan, Do, Review" kit. It was super simple but useful, and yes - assembled painstakingly with Picmonkey. (Pssst! I no longer sell that kit in my Etsy store, but you can get it here for free with this secret link ;) >> Click HERE for the Plan, Do, Review kit.)


Use Adobe Acrobat Pro (this is a part of Adobe’s Creative Cloud Subscription). Find “tools” on the top menu. Select “Forms”, then “Edit”, and “Add New Fields”. This will allow you to create editable fields for your customers built right into your digital products. Note: you cannot copy and paste your fields throughout the document to add more than one editable filed.  Instead, select “Create Multiple Copies” to speed up the process. You will also be able to give fields multiple lines and make them rich text enabled so customers can change the size and fonts of the text.
Numbers nerd. Guilty. I have always completely geeked out when working in Excel and creating spreadsheets that provide the information I need quickly and easily. I hate wasting my time in activities that do not add value and focus my efforts on being efficient as possible. My desire is to help others do the same! The files I create are tailored to the spreadsheet novice and do all the calculating for you. They are also always formatting to print out just right in case you need a hard copy.
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