I sell physical prints mostly out of the fear of someone reselling. Like you said, they could still do that with a physical copy by scanning but at least that’s a little more of a hassle. I’d also hate to see my art printed on shitty paper or the colors are completely off because the buyer (or print service they use) doesn’t put in the effort to get the colors just right.

I'm about to start a Etsy store. I'll be selling art prints. I can't decide whether to sell downloads or physical prints. If I do physical prints I'll be using the Printful integration. I've done some research on Etsy and I see others selling downloads and from the looks of it they are making a killing. 80k in sales of 6 dollar downloads over just a few years. So there is definitely a market for it. I realize however some people might not want the hassle of printing themselves. Which is why I am questioning the digital download idea. However, as I said the digital download shops seem to be doing really well. More then just a few I've found are doing well. I realize that there is always the possibility of someone stealing my work after downloading. I'm fine that since really if someone buys a physical print they could technically make a high quality scan of it and then do the same as they might with a download. For those that offer downloads what is your experience?
When you sit down with a blank greeting card in front of you, don’t be surprised if you can’t seem to put the pen to paper. Many of us get a case of writers block when we sit down to write a birthday card greeting, especially to the people we love the most. Sure, the birthday honoree knows just how much you love and appreciate him or her but, it doesn’t hurt to remind them on their day.
In that moment, I realized that if I really believed that I had created something amazing, something that I knew would help people, then I had to stick to it. I knew that there was probably a million more people out there who would LOVE my Life Binder as much as the 50+ people who had bought it in the last 30 days, but it was MY job to make sure they knew about it.
FTC Required Disclosure: There is absolutely no guarantee of income. I work hard every day to read, study and implement the methods shown in this course. This is a case study with video training showing you exactly the steps I do on a daily basis to achieve the successful sales on this page. This description also contains my affiliate link to a company's designs I use every day. and I get an affiliate commission if you purchase the 365 designs through my link. Working online is the most rewarding "job" I've ever had and I wish you much success on your online business journey. Warmly, Kristie
This is where Pinterest came in. I decided that I was going to use Pinterest as my marketing platform. I wasn't going to spread myself thin across multiple social media arenas. I was going to focus on one, and I knew that Pinterest was the right one for me because it was where I went when I was hungry for printables, so I was familiar with how I could leverage it for my own. Also, Pinterest has this magic fairy dust that is great for businesses - it puts its users in a take-action/shopping frame of mind. When people are on Pinterest, they are typically there because they want to improve some aspect of their life. They are looking for solutions, which often results in a purchase. 
These next two features are for the Silhouette Studio Designer Edition.  I love this feature.  There are so many times I want to access an object within several tightly spaced objects and using the rectangle or ellipse  selection tool is an exercise in frustration.  The flexibility this feature allows in selecting objects is so awesome.  This feature gets a 5 star rating.
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
Perennial Planner has provided Sarah’s family with more financial freedom. Since she has little to no overhead she is able to bring home more profits, and that money has helped cover the “extras” for her family. Sarah and her family live a Dave Ramsey lifestyle with no debt. Although her husband provides the primary income, her Etsy shop has worked to cover extra expenses and provide more security.
One more of my vintage illustrations: this time shabby-looking old fashioned retro photo camera. Illustration is based on my father's old Fujifilm finepix x100 camera. I had never used  this camera, I prefer instant digital photos. I can't imaging paying on each and every photo, just to see it. But I like vintage things and vintage clip art and I enjoy to share my finds. 
On September 22, 2015, federal judge George H. King ruled[40] that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim over the lyrics was invalid.[41][42] The 1935 copyright held by Warner/Chappell applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, not the lyrics or melody.[43] The court held that the question of whether the 1922 and 1927 publications were authorized, thus placing the song in the public domain, presented questions of fact that would need to be resolved at trial.[40] However, Warner/Chappell had failed to prove that it actually had ever held a copyright to the lyrics, so the court was able to grant summary judgment to the plaintiffs, thus resolving the case.[40]

Still, if you prefer to use your own photos and images and want to create quarter- or half-fold cards, Greeting Box may be a good fit. Since Greeting Box doesn’t have photo editing tools, you need to use another application, such as Apple’s Photos, to correct red-eye and crop images before you upload them. Once the images are in the software, you can only drag, layer, rotate and reverse them. There’s also a transparency option, but compared to Hallmark Card Studio’s design suite, which includes more effects and filters, Greeting Box’s tools are very basic. This program’s biggest benefit is its price – it only costs $9.99. Other greeting cards programs cost between $40.00 and $50.00. Our best pick, Canva, is a subscription service with a fee that, over time, can make it cost even more. While Canva has a limited free version, it can be frustrating to only have access to some of the features and graphics, and Greeting Box gives you full access with your initial download. Also, you can order more clip art directly from Greeting Box for a few extra dollars.

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