First, you will need to do at least a Google search, words and/or image, to be sure you won’t run into any copyright or trademark issues. You can also search records at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office online and the Copyright Office online. It may sound silly, but it could end up costing you a lot of time or money if your idea is infringing on someone else’s work.
Have I made my point yet?  They are not kidding when they say bioDIVERSITY.  There is literally every form of living thing available to choose from.  Butterflies and water fowl, more frogs, turtles and lizards than I ever knew existed.  Weird fancy pigeons, big and small game animals…it just goes on and on and on.  The only bad part is you can’t search for specific images but hey, it’s free!
*If you post this on the internet, please give credit to Vintage Glam Studio & link back to my blog (www.vintageglamstudio.com), so others can obtain the resources.  Pinterest, Twitter and Facebook are great social media sharing platforms, it’s the  sharing without a link back that can be a problem. If you use this printable on Instagram, tag me with #vintageglamstudio or @vintageglamstudio. Thanks!
In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."
Hi Angie! Just wanted to contact you about using a couple of your vintage portraits on our church website. We’re doing a promotion for our church directory, trying to encourage folks to get in and get their photos taken and I wanted to do a slide using the couple that could be a wedding photo and the one of the grandma in the garden. While it’s not exactly a “commercial” use, it’s a little more than a “personal” use so I wanted to be sure and have permission before using them! I’m a big fan of your blog and Facebook page and have gained so much inspiration from you! Thanks so much!
About PatternsbyGwen:  Hi my name is Gwen. I’m a 27 year old who grew up loving all crafts.  I started doing stained glass at age 24 when I moved to a big city and took an intro to stained glass class at the local art center. I was hooked! I have a number of other hobbies that I mean to tie in with stained glass. It captures my imagination like no other medium!
If you’re celebrating a birthday boy, you’ll find cards with charming animal illustrations and adventurous forest landscapes perfect for the plucky lad in your life (and all his future derring-do). Those entering their quarter- or mid-life crises deserve a card featuring sharp suiting, refined cocktails, and other trappings of fashionable maturity—it’s not so bad, we swear. Toast or roast the distinguished older gentleman in your life with funny birthday cards for men that make light of all those extra candles on the cake. Dry wit from The New Yorker and Derek Blasberg keeps the comedy fit for an evening at the Cafe Carlyle. Gents of any age will appreciate a card that features frosted gateaus, cream cakes, and other edible birthday indulgences. If you’d prefer to focus on the memories, a photo birthday card with an elegant typographic design or border frame lets you send a particularly sweet portrait of your jolly good fellow as you remember him best.
Whew, it feels like we just barely made it through the Christmas holiday season, but now Valentine’s Day is just around the corner! I made these ninja printable Valentine’s Day cards at the request of my seven-year-old son who asked if I would design “some valentines for boys – with no glittery hearts or love and all that girly stuff!” After reminding him that valentines cards are for Valentine’s Day and all, he finally relented and let me add a few hearts to the cards…as long as they weren’t glittery!
You wouldn’t get everyone in your life the same birthday present, so don’t settle for anything less than the perfect happy birthday card for your honoree. Start with a card featuring cake, macarons, or balloons in vivid colors and patterns that you’d never find at the party supply store. Cards stamped in silver, rose gold, and gold foil make every birthday a milestone (we won’t guess which one). There are even new rainbow and holographic foil choices for the recipient who lives in the future, but can’t resist a wee bit of sparkle. For something truly unique to the two of you, our photo birthday cards let you use a snapshot as the backdrop to your fond wishes—a lovely memento of the previous year, and the many more to come. It’s easy to add photos, crop and filter them, and accentuate your delivery with an envelope liner or designed online backdrop. If you’re a label-conscious gift-giver, pick out a card from design luminaries and master stationers like kate spade new york and Mr. Boddington’s Studio. There’s something for pretty, witty, or just plain silly birthday boys and girls, at every level of taste and rarefaction. (And laughs. Don’t forget laughs.) We’ll make it easier to deliver, too. Once you’ve chosen just the right card for your superannuated friend, use our online design tool to customize the wording and wrap up any lingering details with a figurative bow.
My granddaughter starts kindergarten this year and she has sight words she'll need to know. We made her a set of flash cards with all 300 of her sight words for the year. I needed to get them done and shipped off so she could get a head start and they were here before I knew it. Easy to use, did a mail merge and printed them all out with minor corrections, mostly of the mea culpa variety.
Definitely an idea but less time consuming to do just one or the other. Also I'm thinking of the confusion for the customer. From what I see some digital download shop owners will offer physical prints but they do it as a "blank" store item customers can buy and then reference the image they want printed so I might do that. Do you sell digital downloads or physical prints?
This card has optional greetings: Happy Father's Day!, Happy Birthday!, Happy Belated Birthday!, Have a Great Summer!, Warm Wishes!, Happy Camping!, Go on an Adventure!, Gone Camping!, Enjoy the Great Outdoors!, Good Luck!, Happy Retirement!, You're Invited!, Let's Go Camping!, Thinking of You!, Thank You!, Get Well Soon!, Just Saying Hi!, Have a Great Day!, [No Caption]
This card has optional greetings: Happy New Year, Kung Hei Fat Choi, Wishing You Happiness and Prosperity, Happy Spring, Welcome Spring, Celebrate New Beginnings, Hope Springs Eternal, Stay Strong, With Sympathy, Have a Peaceful Day, Happy Birthday, Happy Anniversary, Thank You, Thinking of You, Get Well Soon, Just Saying Hi, You're Invited, Good Luck, [No Caption]
It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
This card has optional greetings: Merry Christmas!, Season's Greetings!, Happy Holidays!, Happy Christmas!, Happy New Year!, Have an Ice Day!, Thank You!, Celebrate!, Happy Solstice!, Happy Birthday!, Happy Belated Birthday!, Happy Anniversary!, Happy Valentine's Day!, I Love You!, Get Well Soon!, Congratulations!, You're Invited!, Come to the Party!, Just Saying Hi!, Thinking of You!, [No Caption]
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