The origins of "Happy Birthday to You" date back to at least the late 19th century, when two sisters, Patty and Mildred J. Hill, introduced the song "Good Morning to All" to Patty's kindergarten class in Kentucky.[10] Years later, in 1893, they published the tune in their songbook Song Stories for the Kindergarten. Kembrew McLeod stated that the Hill sisters likely copied the tune and lyrical idea from other popular and similar nineteenth-century songs that predated theirs, including Horace Waters' "Happy Greetings to All", "Good Night to You All" also from 1858, "A Happy New Year to All" from 1875, and "A Happy Greeting to All", published 1885. However, American law professor Robert Brauneis disputes this, noting that these earlier songs had quite different melodies.[21]
Some initial news sources characterized the decision as ruling that the song was in the public domain,[43][44] but the decision did not go so far, holding only that Warner/Chappell did not prove they owned the copyright.[41] However, because there are no other claimants to the copyright, and the copyright to the melody long ago expired,[45] the plaintiffs suggested that the song was de facto in the public domain.[41] Also, the judge ruled that the song was not copyrighted by Summy Co., who had written in the song book, "Special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F. Summy Co." Since there was no evidence Summy Co. had copyright on the song, the song is still considered to be in the public domain.[46]
I usually offer PDFs at 8×10 (U.S. standard frame size) or 8.5×11 (U.S. letter size). Let’s assume we’re starting with a PDF in one of those sizes, and let’s assume you aren’t using Photoshop (highly recommended!) or a comparable file-handling app. Printing the PDF from default programs (Reader, Preview, Word) should give you a dialogue box that allows you to adjust sizing by percentage.
A great tip Sarah shared was to encourage independence in smaller children so they can be playing alone and entertained at least for a short time while you do some work. Sarah has been able to achieve her goal of making a part-time income on her own terms with lots of flexibility. Although she tries to continually create new products, she knows that her business was built to allow for flexibility and put her family first.  So Sarah doesn't stress if she can't add new products for a while.  Her business works for her - not the other way around!

Cover Verse: My Beautiful Friend Inside Verse: From the time you were born to this moment today, From the nice things you do to the warm things you say... From the smiles that you share and the help that you give, To the genuine joy in the life that you live... From inside to outside, your beauty shines through, And you make the world better by just being you. Happy Birthday
On September 22, 2015, federal judge George H. King ruled[40] that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim over the lyrics was invalid.[41][42] The 1935 copyright held by Warner/Chappell applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, not the lyrics or melody.[43] The court held that the question of whether the 1922 and 1927 publications were authorized, thus placing the song in the public domain, presented questions of fact that would need to be resolved at trial.[40] However, Warner/Chappell had failed to prove that it actually had ever held a copyright to the lyrics, so the court was able to grant summary judgment to the plaintiffs, thus resolving the case.[40]
Sarah lives in Washington State with her husband and three daughters. She creates printable organizational tools and planners and actually took our ideas and inspiration and brought them to life with her work on the Brilliant Business Planner!  Sarah has been such a wonderful part of our Brilliant Business Moms community since it first began.  She's kind, brilliant, and crazy talented!
It is traditional, among English-speakers, that at a birthday party, the song "Happy Birthday to You" be sung to the birthday person by the other guests celebrating the birthday. More specifically, the birthday person is traditionally presented with a birthday cake with lit candles, with the number of candles sometimes corresponding to the age of the person. After the song is sung (usually just once), party guests sometimes add wishes like "and many more!" expressing the hope that the birthday person will enjoy a long life. The birthday person may be asked to make a wish ("Make a wish!")—which he or she does silently—and then is supposed to blow out the candles. Traditionally, blowing out the candles is believed (or is considered a lighthearted superstition) to ensure that the wish will come true.[20] Once the candles have been blown out, people may applaud, after which the cake may be served, often with the first piece being served to the person whose birthday it is.

You can use your regular weight printer paper! Really! The idea of a printable is that it’s artwork that might be temporary or easy to switch out for something new. However, if you’ve fallen in love with one of my printables (aw, shucks!) and would like a more permanent piece of art, I recommend photo paper (matte), cardstock, premium (heavyweight) paper or archival paper. Make sure to check your printer settings and adjust the paper accordingly so it will not get stuck inside your printer. This is especially true for thicker paper.

This card has optional greetings: Happy Birthday!, Happy Belated Birthday!, Thank You!, Thinking of You!, Just Saying Hi!, Get Well Soon!, Bon Voyage!, Have a Great Trip!, Merry Christmas!, Season's Greetings!, Happy Holidays!, Happy New Year!, Spring is Coming!, Welcome Spring!, Happy Spring!, Warm Wishes!, You're Invited!, Good Luck!, Congratulations!

On September 22, 2015, federal judge George H. King ruled[40] that the Warner/Chappell copyright claim over the lyrics was invalid.[41][42] The 1935 copyright held by Warner/Chappell applied only to a specific piano arrangement of the song, not the lyrics or melody.[43] The court held that the question of whether the 1922 and 1927 publications were authorized, thus placing the song in the public domain, presented questions of fact that would need to be resolved at trial.[40] However, Warner/Chappell had failed to prove that it actually had ever held a copyright to the lyrics, so the court was able to grant summary judgment to the plaintiffs, thus resolving the case.[40]
Warner/Chappell disputed the evidence, arguing that unless there was "necessary authorization from the copyright owner", the "Happy Birthday" lyrics and sheet music would still be subject to common law copyright as an unpublished work, and that it was unknown whether the "special permission" from the Summy Company covered "Good Morning to All", "Happy Birthday", or both, thus alleging that the publication in The Everyday Song Book was unauthorized. The company also argued that it was not acting in bad faith in withholding the evidence of the 1927 publication.[39]

Artist Notes: This is a humorous birthday card especially for dog lovers. It features a colour photographic image of a Jack Russell Terrier Dog leaning forwards with his paws and nose cutely resting on the arm of an office chair. The text above the photo reads 'I've been pondering life, the universe and all that, and I've totally worked out what's most important ...' And inside it reads '... You and cookies, although not necessarily in that order' 'HAPPY BIRTHDAY'

A year passed. 2014 was drawing to a close and I had made a whopping total of...$186.00 Then, in December of 2014, I decided to put together something that was a little more exciting than a single page printable. I created what I called the "Plan, Do, Review" kit. It was super simple but useful, and yes - assembled painstakingly with Picmonkey. (Pssst! I no longer sell that kit in my Etsy store, but you can get it here for free with this secret link ;) >> Click HERE for the Plan, Do, Review kit.)
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