There’s just something about a paper greeting card that never loses its charm for some of us. We like to hold the greeting in our hands, feel the crisp paper, run our fingers over the words and pictures as if we were trying to absorb the essence of the message. Most of all we like to see the handwritten notes and the signatures of our loved ones. While ecards may be viewed instantly and forgotten over time, printed cards can be saved, cherished and shared for years. Although ecards have replaced printed cards in many instances as the more convenient, inexpensive and quick mode of wishing one another, printed cards still retain that special quality that electronic messages cannot convey effectively.
After you’ve picked out the perfect card for your man of the hour, use our online design tool to give it one last touch-up around the collars and cufflinks. Pick out new fonts and colors to draft your message with and finish your delivery with a custom envelope liner and backdrop—making online delivery as rapturous an unveiling as a special delivery. You can add your recipient’s name to the online address book for next year’s card, too, to save filing time in your contacts..

It is likely that teachers and students spontaneously adapted the published version of "Good Morning to All" to celebrate birthdays in the classroom, changing the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" in the process.[3] The complete text of "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print as the final four lines of Edith Goodyear Alger's poem "Roy's Birthday", published in her book A Primer of Work and Play, copyrighted by D. C. Heath in 1901, with no reference to the words being sung.[22] The first book including "Happy Birthday" lyrics set to the tune of "Good Morning to All" that bears a date of publication is from 1911 in The Elementary Worker and His Work, but earlier references exist to a song called "Happy Birthday to You" including an article from 1901 in the Inland Educator and Indiana School Journal.[23] Children's Praise and Worship, edited by Andrew Byers, Bessie L. Byrum and Anna E. Koglin, published the song in 1918. In 1924, Robert Coleman included "Good Morning to All" in a songbook with the birthday lyrics as a second verse. Coleman also published "Happy Birthday" in The American Hymnal in 1933.
This card has optional greetings: Merry Christmas!, Season's Greetings!, Happy Holidays!, Happy Christmas!, Happy New Year!, Have an Ice Day!, Thank You!, Celebrate!, Happy Solstice!, Happy Birthday!, Happy Belated Birthday!, Happy Anniversary!, Happy Valentine's Day!, I Love You!, Get Well Soon!, Congratulations!, You're Invited!, Come to the Party!, Just Saying Hi!, Thinking of You!, [No Caption]
×