The printables I was adding to my store at that time were very inexpensive - I charged $3 at most. Throughout the month, I'd make a sale here and there. My phone had the Etsy Seller app downloaded onto it and the app would notify me of a sale by making an AMAZING "cha-ching!!" sound. I loved it even though I only made enough to pay for my fancy lattes here and there.
I sell physical prints mostly out of the fear of someone reselling. Like you said, they could still do that with a physical copy by scanning but at least that’s a little more of a hassle. I’d also hate to see my art printed on shitty paper or the colors are completely off because the buyer (or print service they use) doesn’t put in the effort to get the colors just right.
For price like around 200 breakfast still not included. Luxury I mean for such not clean room (floors, corners, under furniture and bed spots). The cleaning lady came into the room without knocking (wow!) 30 minutes before the checkout (wow!), I was in the bathroom half-naked (wow!). We stayed in the city only one night and wanted to find a late supper in a good restaurant (we were dressed for a glamorous dinner) and asked advice from the receptionist lady (local resident?) and she advised only ‘Hot wings’ (‘hey, do you see that I'm in the long evening red dress?!’). I mean, the pictures that are used for promo are much better than what they really are.
A date-book is an arrangement of sorting out days for social, religious, business or authoritative purposes. This is finished by offering names to time frames, ordinarily days, weeks, months and years. A date is the assignment of a solitary, particular day inside such a framework. A timetable is likewise a physical record (frequently paper) of such a framework. A schedule can likewise mean a rundown of arranged occasions, for example, a court logbook or an incompletely or completely ordered rundown of records, for example, a date-book of wills.
The origins of "Happy Birthday to You" date back to at least the late 19th century, when two sisters, Patty and Mildred J. Hill, introduced the song "Good Morning to All" to Patty's kindergarten class in Kentucky.[10] Years later, in 1893, they published the tune in their songbook Song Stories for the Kindergarten. Kembrew McLeod stated that the Hill sisters likely copied the tune and lyrical idea from other popular and similar nineteenth-century songs that predated theirs, including Horace Waters' "Happy Greetings to All", "Good Night to You All" also from 1858, "A Happy New Year to All" from 1875, and "A Happy Greeting to All", published 1885. However, American law professor Robert Brauneis disputes this, noting that these earlier songs had quite different melodies.[21]
In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, it is traditional for one of the guests to enthusiastically lead with "Hip hip ..." and then for all of the other guests to join in and say "... hooray!" This is normally repeated three times. In Canada, especially at young children's birthdays, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, the singers segue into "How old are you now? How old are you now? How old are you now-ow, how old are you now?" and then count up: "Are you one? Are you two? Are you ..." until they reach the right age, at which the celebrant says "yes", and everybody else, who presumably know the right number, all cheer.[citation needed]
In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, it is traditional for one of the guests to enthusiastically lead with "Hip hip ..." and then for all of the other guests to join in and say "... hooray!" This is normally repeated three times. In Canada, especially at young children's birthdays, immediately after "Happy Birthday" has been sung, the singers segue into "How old are you now? How old are you now? How old are you now-ow, how old are you now?" and then count up: "Are you one? Are you two? Are you ..." until they reach the right age, at which the celebrant says "yes", and everybody else, who presumably know the right number, all cheer.[citation needed]
For price like around 200 breakfast still not included. Luxury I mean for such not clean room (floors, corners, under furniture and bed spots). The cleaning lady came into the room without knocking (wow!) 30 minutes before the checkout (wow!), I was in the bathroom half-naked (wow!). We stayed in the city only one night and wanted to find a late supper in a good restaurant (we were dressed for a glamorous dinner) and asked advice from the receptionist lady (local resident?) and she advised only ‘Hot wings’ (‘hey, do you see that I'm in the long evening red dress?!’). I mean, the pictures that are used for promo are much better than what they really are.

Hi Angie! Just wanted to contact you about using a couple of your vintage portraits on our church website. We’re doing a promotion for our church directory, trying to encourage folks to get in and get their photos taken and I wanted to do a slide using the couple that could be a wedding photo and the one of the grandma in the garden. While it’s not exactly a “commercial” use, it’s a little more than a “personal” use so I wanted to be sure and have permission before using them! I’m a big fan of your blog and Facebook page and have gained so much inspiration from you! Thanks so much!


Artist Notes:	Could there be a more fun and colorful way to Happy Birthday to friends, family or business colleagues this year? The message "Wish Big for your birthday" appears in big, colorful letters, overlapping each other, with both of the letter "i's" transforming into candles, with flames atop them. The black background makes the brightly colored letters pop out in celebration. The inside wording of the card is "May all your birthday wishes come true!"

In a 1998 episode of the television show Sports Night, "Intellectual Property", character Dan Rydell sings the song to his co-anchor during a telecast, forcing his network to pay royalties, and causing him to ask his colleagues to choose public-domain songs for him to sing for their birthdays.[57] The copyright is also referenced frequently in a Disney A.N.T. Farm episode where characters repeatedly try to sing the song, only to be stopped by others reminding them of the price. The melody of the song is also featured in The Wrong Trousers but was replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" for DVD releases. The use of the song is a problem even if it is sung in a made-up language, as a Klingon-language version was nixed in pre-production from the 7th-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation called "Parallels", replaced with "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" in Klingon. In the Futurama episode "I Second That Emotion", they poke fun at the song and its copyright by making their own version with the lyrics "What day is today? / It's (birthday person)'s birthday / What a day for a birthday / Let's all have some cake."

Print everything from flash cards and recipe cards to promotional cards and contact cards in a few simple steps with Avery Index Cards. The 3 inch x 5 inch cards are easy to design and print yourself using free printable designs and index card templates on the official website. Just personalize your template and print as many as you need. The micro-perforations make it easy to separate your cards quickly and cleanly, so you’re ready to get back to work in no time. Great for students, teachers, home and office use.

None of the early appearances of the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics included credits or copyright notices. The Summy Company registered a copyright in 1935, crediting authors Preston Ware Orem and Mrs. R. R. Forman. In 1988, Warner/Chappell Music purchased the company owning the copyright for US$25 million, with the value of "Happy Birthday" estimated at US$5 million.[10][11] Based on the 1935 copyright registration, Warner claimed that the United States copyright will not expire until 2030, and that unauthorized public performances of the song are illegal unless royalties are paid to Warner. In one specific instance in February 2010, the royalty for a single use was said to be US$700.[12] By one estimate, the song is the highest-earning single song in history.[13] In the European Union, the copyright for the song expired on January 1, 2017.[14]
This card has optional greetings: Merry Christmas!, Season's Greetings!, Happy Holidays!, Happy Christmas!, Happy New Year!, Have an Ice Day!, Thank You!, Celebrate!, Happy Solstice!, Happy Birthday!, Happy Belated Birthday!, Happy Anniversary!, Happy Valentine's Day!, I Love You!, Get Well Soon!, Congratulations!, You're Invited!, Come to the Party!, Just Saying Hi!, Thinking of You!, [No Caption]
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