Artist Notes: This is a humorous birthday card especially for dog lovers. It features a colour photographic image of a Jack Russell Terrier Dog leaning forwards with his paws and nose cutely resting on the arm of an office chair. The text above the photo reads 'I've been pondering life, the universe and all that, and I've totally worked out what's most important ...' And inside it reads '... You and cookies, although not necessarily in that order' 'HAPPY BIRTHDAY'
More than 100 years ago Thermos used to be called a Dewar flask or Dewar bottle after its inventor  Scottish physicist and chemist Sir James Dewar. He invented it in 1892, but in 1904 lost a court case in claiming the rights to the invention to German company, Thermos GmbH, who started commertial production of vacuum flasks by the brand name "Thermos".
This card has optional greetings: Happy New Year, Kung Hei Fat Choi, Wishing You Happiness and Prosperity, Happy Spring, Welcome Spring, Celebrate New Beginnings, Hope Springs Eternal, Stay Strong, With Sympathy, Have a Peaceful Day, Happy Birthday, Happy Anniversary, Thank You, Thinking of You, Get Well Soon, Just Saying Hi, You're Invited, Good Luck, [No Caption]

I used this product with the Avery template 5388 from the Avery website and using Microsoft Word to print 3 x 5 cards and it worked great. The sheets are sturdy enough to take two passes through my Brother laser printer, printing first on one side and then manually turning the sheet over to print on the other side. After printing, the cards are easily removed from the sheet and have very smooth borders which look quite professional.

Hi, I love looking at all of your post and have printed and used some of them, they are just wonderful and I love looking at all the pictures. I am subscribed to your site but do not get your post in my email anymore. I did get them and then a few months back they stopped coming. I have a yahoo email do you think that has anything to do with it? Is there another way I can get them sent right to me instead of finding them on other sites?
The documentary film The Corporation states that Warner/Chappell charged up to US$10,000 for the song to appear in a film. Because of the copyright issue, filmmakers rarely showed complete singalongs of "Happy Birthday" in films, either substituting the public-domain "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" or avoiding using a song entirely. Before the song was copyrighted it was used freely, as in Bosko's Party, a Warner Bros. cartoon of 1932, where a chorus of animals sings it twice through. The copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" is directly referenced in a 2009 episode of the TV series iCarly, "iMake Sam Girlier", in which the main character as well as others begin to sing the song to Sam but are prevented from doing so by Freddie, who says the song isn't public domain; "For She's a Jolly Good Fellow" is then sung instead.
The eyedropper tool copies the color of any single pixel in the editing window and allows you to auto-populate a color wheel and create a custom palette. There’s also a photo analyzer tool to help you identify the dominant color in a photo to make a more informed design choice. Using these advanced editing tools takes some practice, but once you figure them out, you can create high-quality and customized cards from scratch. The biggest downside of this program is the lack of templates and graphics. Although, the included graphics are high-quality and showed no signs of distortion or pixilation when we moved and resized them to fit our test designs. This is a great greeting card software if you have basic design skills and want to create customized cards from scratch.

Silhouette knocked it out of the park with this sophisticated feature.  This tool  enables you to warp your text in the preselected shapes shown or as the picture shows– it places a grid and small handles on the text.  With the object selected you can basically “warp” or manipulate the text as you wish.  This feature is great for SVG designers.  This feature is standard in the Adobe Software Suite ( Photoshop, Illustrator)  so this feature gets a 5 star rating from me.
A year passed. 2014 was drawing to a close and I had made a whopping total of...$186.00 Then, in December of 2014, I decided to put together something that was a little more exciting than a single page printable. I created what I called the "Plan, Do, Review" kit. It was super simple but useful, and yes - assembled painstakingly with Picmonkey. (Pssst! I no longer sell that kit in my Etsy store, but you can get it here for free with this secret link ;) >> Click HERE for the Plan, Do, Review kit.)

Canva is the best place to design greeting cards if you have a Mac, but you can also use it to create hundreds of other projects, including business cards, flyers, book covers and infographics. In addition to being stylish, Canva’s images are high quality – you can move them around and resize them to fit your design without causing pixilation or creating jagged edges. And if you can’t find the right graphic in its huge library or you want to share a personal photo, you can upload your own. However, Canva is missing some basic photo editing tools, including a cropping tool and a red-eye remover, so you need to edit your images before you upload them. Also, it doesn’t have templates for traditional multi-fold cards like those you find in stores. Instead, it has templates to create flat, postcard-style cards. Another potential drawback is Canva is a subscription service. However, it’s easy to cancel your membership, so depending on the scope of your projects, it can end up costing less than some of the other programs we tested. There is also a decent free version, though it includes limited access to graphics. The service’s excellent support pages make it easy to figure out which membership is right for you or your business – its support information is searchable and detailed.

My Plan, Do, Review kit continued to sell, but I had another collection of useful templates bubbling in my mind. Before I had even ever started this blog, I had been using a system called the Ultimate Life Binder as a way to keep track of my life. It was my central hub for setting goals, measuring my progress, and generally just being aware of where I was, where I was going, and what I was working on a day to day basis. It was comprised of life-management printables that I had printed out from my findings on the web and some that I had created myself to suit me even more personally. 
Here and there I shared my Life Binder process on this blog. It truly was the cornerstone of how I was taking 100% responsibility for my life - a life philosophy that this blog is all about. My audience showed a lot of interest in it and I had friends constantly asking me to help them put together their own Life Binders. However, as with anything that we're really good at, I didn't consider turning it into something that other people could buy and use because, well, "it's so easy, anybody can make their own." Hahaha. *Business tip: If you ever find yourself saying that about something that you're good at, please turn it into a product. It could make you a millionaire and make a lot of people's lives better.
Well it is also cost effective. A lot less expensive to purchase a download and then print it yourself on your home printer, at your local printshop, or online through a website. I don't know if it's more of an impulse purchase. I think it is attractive to people that like DIY projects. By using a downloadable file you have a lot of options for printing as opposed to only have it printed in one way.

This versatile pack of 150 printable cards is wonderful for designing and printing your own sales & marketing collateral, flash cards, recipes, coupons, RSVP cards, decorative post cards and more. These blank index cards are unlined, ready for whatever destiny you have planned for them. They are ideal for the classroom, homework, studying, filing and contact information cards. A micro-perforated design makes them quick and easy to separate, so you can maximize your productivity at your workplace, classroom or home. Choose from the thousands of free templates and designs at avery.com/templates to add attention-grabbing text and graphics to both sides of your blank index card, and then print them out on your laser or inkjet printer for exceptional smudge and jam-free results. Convenient, easy-to-use and endlessly customizable, these unruled index cards are an unbeatable choice for an all-purpose printable card.

Prior to the lawsuit, Warner/Chappell had been earning $2 million a year licensing the song for commercial use,[44] with a notable example the $5,000 paid by the filmmakers of the 1994 documentary, Hoop Dreams,[47] in order to safely distribute the film.[48] On February 8, 2016, Warner/Chappell agreed to pay a settlement of $14 million to those who had licensed the song, and would allow a final judgment declaring the song to be in the public domain, with a final hearing scheduled in March 2016.[49][50] On June 28, 2016, the final settlement was officially granted and the court declared that the song was in the public domain.[18] The following week, Nelson's short-form documentary, Happy Birthday: my campaign to liberate the people's song, was published online by The Guardian.[51]
One more of my vintage illustrations: this time shabby-looking old fashioned retro photo camera. Illustration is based on my father's old Fujifilm finepix x100 camera. I had never used  this camera, I prefer instant digital photos. I can't imaging paying on each and every photo, just to see it. But I like vintage things and vintage clip art and I enjoy to share my finds. 
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